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Items by william copper

Results: 177
Title Author Date
Comment: Re: songs about birds for a unison children's choir
Another, the poem "Birds" by American poet Richard Stoddard, set by William Copper, and beginning   Birds are singing 'round my window Tunes the sweetest ever heard And I put my cage out daily But I never catch a bird.   Also arranged for treble chorus and piano, score: http://www.hartenshi...
Comment: Re: songs about birds for a unison children's choir
The poem, Answer to a Child's Question,  beginning "Do you ask what the birds say?" by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, set by William Copper as part of the Songs from the Book of Knowledge.   Arranged for unison trebles and piano, score here:   http://www.hartenshield.com/0484_1_do_you_ask.pdf   A...
Comment: Re: Looking for medium/easy SAB songs for concert
Agnus Dei by William Copper, SAB a cappella ... if you can use Latin.    Recording:  https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper/0573_agnus_dei   Score:  http://www.hartenshield.com/0573_agnus_dei.pdf  
PDF Document: O Swallow, Swallow
Comment: Re: Autumn/winter theme SA piece
The poem "O Swallow, Swallow" by Tennyson, set for SSA and piano.   Easy, most experienced choirs could probably sight read it.   Limited range for Mezzo and Alto, but still interesting parts.       Recording: https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper/0380_o_swallow   Score: http://www.harten...
Comment: Re: This Non-Profit Organization is a Chorus, Not the American Cancer Society!
Susan, this isn't 'professional' advice, just advice with some experience behind it: the corporation support you seem to downplay is actually very important, more, I believe, than the dollars themselves reflect.   Along with the $250 (say) you get from your local medium-to-big corporation, you get...
Comment: Re: Methods for Practicing Rhythm
Please forgive me for expressing an opinion above; it is my opinion, but then I like Mozart and some don't.    More on rhythm, a hypothesis:  in music there is rhythm at many levels:  the whole bar, the half bar (often), the beat, the main subdivision of the beat, and the counter-to-the-beat fe...
Comment: Re: Methods for Practicing Rhythm
Helen's ideas are good;  the title of Anna's method sounds promising.     Kodaly was a lousy composer (imo) but the rhythm methods work pretty well.    Any kind of walk-to-the-beat and clap-the-portions-of-the-beat can be very helpful.  Just be sure to change the tempo often, otherwise you...
Comment: Re: 20 -40 minute sacred work
William Copper, "Magnficat"  35 minutes   Soundcloud has complete recording   William Copper, "Moses at the Jordan River", 75 minutes , several excerpts on soundcloud.   Good luck, Susan!
Community Forum Post: Gold Platters
As Jack has admirably grown this community, he has filled the silver platter with his credible taste for music.   But if one looks at the collection, it may be already far too big, deep, or wide to be a useful tool for the conductor.   When I look at some of the pieces, some I fe...
Comment: Re: Advice on setting Biblical text to a choral composition
If you are using English, as others have suggested, the translation is important.  For many passages, I find the Revised Standard from the 1960s a good choice.  It is (I think) mostly an accurate translation, and it is relatively euphonious.  All my "Moses at the Jordan River" oratorio used this ...
Comment: Re: Repertoire for a Prairie style/Frank Lloyd Wright inspired concert
Good point, Thomas.   Virgil T, though an effective choral writer, was hardly in the same league as FL Wright.   So some of the more adventurous of the composers of the day might be far better choices.
Comment: Re: Darkness and Light Concert
One of the pieces from the oratorio Moses at the Jordan River would suit perfectly.  "Darkness".   It's one of the plagues of Egypt, text from the Torah in English.  There is a brief excerpt with orchestra at https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper  Scroll pretty far down the page, #34, March, "Da...
Comment: Re: When your choir dislikes a piece on your program
Seems that jazz is out these days.  My daughters, college and senior high school, scorn it.   They can take classical, or 'contemporary' a cappella (which goes all the way back to 'The Lion Sleeps Tonight') but jazz leaves them cold entirely.   Must be generational.
Comment: Re: Baby Grand!
As to verifying its condition, sure.  Check the soundboard for cracks, the action for ease, the tuning pins for stability.   As to how to move it, really.   My piano technician mentor David Andrews at Eastman was about 5' 1", pudgy, but could move a 9' Steinway D by himself.  It's just techniq...
Community Forum Post: solo voice with orchestra
In hopes of more interesting conversations about using synthesis to pretend to be the real music, here's my first major try at a bass-baritone with orchestra:   https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper/0565_23  "Why hast thou dealt ill with thy servant?"   I probably will replace the vocal track w...
Comment: Re: Edgy contemporary choral music (no pretty, please)
"We smote him" by William Copper  https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper/we-smote-him  The recording available is for orchestra, but also quite effective with piano.    Totally different, edgy in a completely different way: "Water water everywhere" http://www.hartenshield.com/water_water.html ...
Comment: Re: Programming help: In Windsor Forest
The middle section of my New Lovelife Dances would suit, I'd think.   I always hate to read things like "we need easy new music because all our rehearsal time is taken with difficult old music", however.   The orchestra directors often say the same.   Marlowe, #4, Come with me and be my love ...
Comment: Re: Teaching Italian Diction to High School Musical Theatre Students
After I posted the above, looked again at "ecco" online:  here's a great post for this multi-faceted word:   http://blogs.transparent.com/italian/colloquial-italian-1-ecco/
Comment: Re: Teaching Italian Diction to High School Musical Theatre Students
A word or two to use:  "Ecco" (this, or thus, or such) helps reinforce the double consonant sounds that are frequent in Italian.  "Grazie"  (thank you)  reinforce the italian R and light ending vowels.  "Allora" (untranslatable emphatic but very common) to show that many words just don't quit...
Comment: Re: Repertoire for choir with violin and cello
For 'cello alone with choir, "Quia respexit humilitatem ancillae suae" from Magnificat by William Copper.    Dramatic 'cello part, not difficult choir parts.    Recording: https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper/magnificat-3-quia-respexit-for-cello-and-chorus   Full score:  www.hartenshield....
Announcement: Stabat Mater
New recording of Stabat Mater (SATB and Orchestra).   https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper/stabat-mater   Copper: "Un musicista che sembra sbucato dal Barocco, attraversando le tempeste musicali dell'Ottocento e del Novecento, raccogliendo i frammenti di un'intero evo musicale... Una musica ra...
Comment: Re: Basses singing octave lower
Melissa, I expected others to provide good advice.  My rather limited experience is in children's opera, where I encountered the same problem.   One approach is to try to get all the males on the lower octave, then work it up scalewise in unison.    So you will be asking your better/higher boy...
Comment: Re: Trouble with decrescendos
Many good answers.  Here's another point of view: as the volume diminishes, tuning becomes clearer.   So you WANT the third of a major triad to fall in pitch, into a pure triad.   Or in a minor triad, you WANT the tonic and fifth to fall in pitch, into tune.   Be clear what you are hearing, a...
Comment: Re: American composer repertoire
Hi, Megan, At soundcloud.com/williamcopper, top of the page, you'll find a recording of Agnus Dei for SAB.   It was recognized this week with a 'silver platter' award at choralnet.    There's a link given for the perusal pdf score.     Not yet printed in octavo but I license it for pdf de...
Comment: Re: So-so Pianist Directing a Choir
Work on your falsetto, too: it's very helpful to sing an example in the right octave. 
Comment: Re: How to get middle school boys interested in singing?
My father, born 1902, learned the Toreador March in his country one-room primary school and remembered it (and sang it occasionally) all his life, along with "a rambling wreck from Georgia Tech" (no idea what the title of that song is) and "I was born ten thousand years ago".   I fully agree with ...
Community Forum Post: Better midi renditions: Mozart as example
Hello, colleagues,    Many of us have attempted to make mock-ups of our works in one way or another, from an unadorned midi sequence to a hired chorus.   Here's a pretty good, I think, rendition by midi of Mozart's Ave Verum Corpus.     https://...
Comment: Re: Mozart Ave Verum tuning example
Apologies to anyone with an interest in this piece or the subject of tuning for the delay in posting the complete work.    Now posted at   http://intonalist.wordpress.com/2014/04/17/mozart-k618-ave-verum-corpus-final/  with a link to full pdf score and full recording.     Let me know if ...
Comment: Re: Losing Middle School Choir
Do I read this right:    For 3rd graders you spend 46 minutes every day, taking all 3rd graders?  Looks like you serve as a play-time monitor to give the other teachers a break. For 4th graders you spend 46 minutes every day, taking all 4th graders? For 5th graders you spend 46 minutes every ...
Comment: Re: SAB acapella for Freshman/Soph non-auditioned choir?
https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper/agnus-dei-sab-a-cappella   Link to full perusal score included above.    William
Comment: Re: Conference Morsel: TOO Concerned with Tuning?
Lucy and Ronald, on rereading your responses, I mostly have to agree.  The only thing that I see as missing is an understanding by the music director of when a voice must tune  high, when tune low, when tune to another voice, and when hold steady for another voice to tune to it.  I believe that w...
Comment: Re: Conference Morsel: TOO Concerned with Tuning?
Do you know who else doesn't care? You don't care. Do you hate all Motown music? Most likely not. I'll bet there are many songs that make you happy But the vocals are well outside what would be considered "in tune" nowadays. And they're beautiful. And real.   This has to be one of the lamest co...
Comment: Re: Church Sanctuary Policy?
One more thing to consider, beyond the many good points already made.   Your "quiet and reverent music": is this improvisation?  If so, you might ask yourself, are you really producing a musical experience for a listener that is worth listening to?  Improvisation so often is simply boring noodli...
Comment: Re: Byrd "Ave Verum Corpus" tuning example
Complete intonation-marked score and recording now available, same link as above.    Marilyn, brief answers to your questions:  choral samples, the sound of singers singing vowels (and, in a limited way, consonants) and 'pitch wheel' the midi tuning control.     I'm writing more and more ab...
Comment: Re: Byrd "Ave Verum Corpus" tuning example
Update: phrases 3-4, the remainder of section 1 posted.   If Byrd elevates the intonation for the body and the cross, will he lower the intonation for "Esto nobis"?   Sure enough!     Same link.    If you follow the markings carefully, you will see that every interval is perfectly tuned...
Comment: Re: Byrd "Ave Verum Corpus" tuning example
Second phrase posted.  If my interpretation is correct, Byrd did it again: intentionally raised the intonation for "on the cross".   Same link as above. 
Forum message: Byrd "Ave Verum Corpus" tuning example
Continuing the studies in intonation begun several years ago, I've posted the first phrase of Byrd's Ave Verum Corpus with tuning markings.  And a linked recording from the page.   If my interpretation is correct, Byrd has intentionally raised the entire intonation by a comma on the word "corpus"...
Comment: Re: The evolution of the six original choral schools in America in the Early 20th Century
The above mentioned "Choral Conducting: A Symposium" is indeed the source of the 6 schools.  Don't waste your money on the book though, very very little of value in it.  I spent $2 on it recently at a thrift store and would rather have had a cup of coffee.   William
Comment: Re: Texts to inaugurate a new auditorium
My setting of Numbers 24:5-6, "How fair are your tents, O Jacob, your encampments, O Israel, like valleys that stretch, like gardens beside the river."  might suit this purpose.  It's a short chorale (1 1/2 minutes) from Moses at the Jordan River, an oratorio.   Brief example recording here:  h...
Comment: Re: The Joy of Sight Reading
I have to say, as one who loves to sight read and gets bored, very bored, with repetition:  of your points, 1 to last, only the last applies to me.  I loved to sight read when I was a beginner, so not that high a level; I am not 'gritty' (i hope); I am definitely shy, don't want to 'sing out'.  ...
Comment: Re: Exciting extended sacred works from 20th-21st Century composers
I'm happy to offer two options:   1) The five part Marian Motets for Chorus and Orchestra.   From Magnificat to Stabat Mater.   Individual durations approximately as follows, Magnificat 35 minutes, O Magnum Mysterium 5 minutes, Ave Maria 5 minutes, Ave Regina Caelorum, 5 minutes, and Stabat ...
Forum message: Minor Seconds, Augmented Unisons, enharmonics, and unisons
Continuing the series of careful examination of musical intervals, this post deals with minor seconds and unisons:   http://intonalist.wordpress.com/2014/03/04/minor-seconds-augmented-unisons-and-unisons-retuned/   Earlier posts in the series:   Major Thirds: http://intonalist.wordpress.com...
Comment: Re: The "New Voice Type" coming to our choruses
One more recent factor may be the extreme white noise content in much recent popular music.  Lady Gaga, for instance, has some good material, but it's overweighted by a great deal of noise from digital percussion: making the vocal overtones impossible to hear, and thus, making young people think it...
Announcement: We smote him
New recording of chorus from Moses at the Jordan River (oratorio).   "We smote him" for chorus SATB and orchestra by William Copper   https://soundcloud.com/williamcopper/we-smote-him
Forum message: Sight tuning exercise
A harmonization of the Mass XVII chant Agnus Dei, useful perhaps for both sight reading and exercise in tuning perfectly.   http://intonalist.wordpress.com/2014/02/20/sight-tuning-exercise/   May be used free, but requires an explicit license stamp in each pdf copy.   Contact me directly for...
Community Forum Post: Easy Harmonization contest $50 prize
Given a five note melodic fragment that begins and ends on tonic can you correctly identify the acceptable possible harmonizations?   Real money prize, deadline Feb 28   http://intonalist.wordpress.com/2014/02/11/think-like-the-intonalist-contest/   William Copper
Comment: Re: GUEST BLOG: “Four Main Reasons Why Barbershop Singing Sounds Unique,” by Jon Nicholas
Nice summary!  As to #2, I'd stick with "barbershop seventh" because singers add the sixth overtone (7th harmonic) to nearly any major triad, regardless of its tonal position, and tune it very high, as in the harmonic series.  Generally, that makes a ringing overtone-locked chord, as you say, and ...
Comment: Re: new HS teacher: Help with altos (pitch, staying on part, etc)
Update: I came back too late to edit my comment ... your exercise, however, is great for getting a group to understand that there IS a pitch, and that it's in their control to move it around and tune it.  
Comment: Re: new HS teacher: Help with altos (pitch, staying on part, etc)
Stuart Hunt, I must beg to differ: the tuner indeed lies.   A 'natural' singer will sing a different major third than the tuner says, and be right.