Advertise on ChoralNet 
ChoralNet logo
The mission of the ACDA is to inspire excellence in choral music through education, performance, composition, and advocacy.

Items by Kari Turunen

Results: 35
Title Author Date
Comment: Re: Translation of "Hanget Soi" by Heikki Sarmanto
The poem is by Eino Leino, an absolute magician of a poet, from the collection Yökehrääjä 1897. His poems are often incredibly musical, and this one is no exception. Here is a word-for-word quick translation.   Hanget soi, hanget soi, - literally, hanget is a plural (the snows) and soi is to ...
Comment: Re: What is the most perfect piece of choral music ever composed? Opinions, please.
The Credo of Palestrina's Missa Papae Marcelli, the Mouton Nesciens Mater, Josquin's Ave Maria, the last movement of Handel's Dixit Dominus, Wie habe ich dein Gesetze so lieb from Schütz's Schwanengesang, Lacrimosa from Mozart's Requiem, Bach's Komm Jesu, komm, Letztes Glück from the Brahms Fünf ...
Comment: Re: Stanford's 'The Blue Bird'
From experience I know that it works nicely with eight singers. I think you can find our (Lumen Valo) version on youtube. A smaller group enforces the intimacy of the piece.
Comment: Re: The Demise of pre-1900s Music?
Are we actually out of proportion, as Cherwyn suggests? Perhaps we are the ones who are in proportion, not the general musical establishment? I have been thinking about this quite a bit and feel fortunate that choral audiences are so open to new music.   That said, yes, there is a case for progra...
Comment: Re: wrong (?) note in Kverno's "Corpus Christi Carol"
I've been using a Sulasol edition  licensed from Norsk MF. It has only the first g flat. I suggest the Norwegian recording you have is correct.
Comment: Re: French pronunciation of Latin
I agree with most of what has been said in this discussion. I have great respect for anyone who really takes it upon themselves to work on the assumed pronunciation of a certain time and place. At times it can reveal beauties that otherwise lie hidden in the music. But I have always found the simpli...
Comment: Re: Morales Missa Ave Maria
There is a 1551 edtion available on the net. http://imslp.org/wiki/Missarum,_Liber_I_et_II_%28Morales,_Crist%C3%B3bal_de%29. It is in Liber II, and the Ave Maria Mass in unfortunately divided between two segments. It begins on page 70 of http://erato.uvt.nl/files/imglnks/usimg/8/8f/IMSLP234540-SIBLE...
Comment: Re: music for women's voices and clarinet
Jaakko Mäntyjärvi has a delightful little piece called Eel reverie (http://www.fimic.fi/fimic/fimic.nsf/WWOR/3020C24E4C8369A6C225753700279CD3?opendocument). It's only a couple of minutes long, not too demanding, and would probably work well with your forces.
Comment: Re: Straight Tone Choral Tradition (Specific Ensembles?)
Hello all, and greetings from the North.   I have a few additions to this discussion. First of all, I think it is extremely dubious to speak of a (or the) European tradition. There are so many different traditions of music and vocal style on the Old continent that such generalisations feel un...
Comment: Re: Fear Not: Theme for Women's Choir
Karin Rehnqvist, the Swedish composer, has some wonderful music for female choir. The one closest to your theme is Triumf att finnas till (A triumph to exist, 1990), but it is a very demanding work. However, there is a lovely little two-part song called Do not fear darkness (Var inte rädd för m...
Comment: Re: Lotti Crucifixus a 8
I think it's admirable that Monica wants to use individual voice parts. Yes, John's points are valid and choirs do learn pieces much quicker than from parts. But at the same time, going through the same experience of singing as our Renaissance / Baroque counterparts must reveal something a score f...
Comment: Re: Favorite Lassus pieces
The Lagrime is my great favourite, but I would also recommend the motet Aurora lucis rutilat à 10 and the Magnificat based on it. The Four Marian motets, especially Ave regina caelorum, Regina caeli laetare, published by Mapa Mundi are wonderful. And I heard a brilliant performance of the old cla...
Comment: Re: Tempo changes in Renaissance Masses
Hi all,   a few general comments first. "Renaissance Masses" covers about 150 years of music. Think back 150 years from now (or 150 years from 1850) and consider the stylistic changes in that time. It would be quite hard to find too many common denominators, I suspect. I think we need to assu...
Comment: Re: Victoria's "O Magnum Mysterium"
I suggest you look at facsimiles of the original partbooks (http://www.uma.es/victoria/1572/1572.html). In Victoria's times the tactus was the duration of one semibrevis (the diamondlike notehead). It was divided into a downbeat and an upbeat, each thus taking a minima (the ones that look like mod...
Comment: Re: Working on tone & blending while notes are still being learned?
Just an addition to the sage words of my colleagues: I would like to point out that it's worth approaching the question from the point of view of the singer. Early on in the learning process, the singers' priorities lie in learning the intervals (and text, if it is in a language they consider diff...
Comment: Re: Looking for "beautiful" Madrigal
Monteverdi's IV Book of Madrigals is full of fantastic pieces. Sfogava con le stelle, Piagn'e sospira, Longe da te, Ah dolente partita etc. Of the English madrigals, I love anything by John Ward. Come sable night and If the deep sighs are magnificent. But my greatest love is reserved for Wilbye's ...
Comment: Re: choral settings of the Lord's Prayer
How about the Verdi Pater noster? It's not strictly the Lord's prayer but an adaptation by Dante Alighieri. Lovely and sonorous.
Comment: Re: Singing the Song of Songs?
Besides the Palestrina cycle (Canticum canticorum), I would suggest:   Two Extracts from the Song of Solomon by Bengt Johansson (Edition Fazer) - the 1st movement, I sat down under his shadow, is astonishing.   Songs of Solomon by Juhani Komulainen  (Sulasol).  Several movements, some ...
Comment: Re: The piano helps in Rehearsals?
Almost all the Nordic choir conductors use the piano quite a lot in their rehearsals. I am extremely speptical that it leads to the phenomena described above. I don't hear Nordic choirs sing in equal temperament or find that they learn the music more slowly than their counterparts in non-piano cul...
Comment: Re: Bach St. John Passion - dealing with questions of Anti-Semitism
I've been following this discussion with great interest and have feel a certain amount of sympathy to arguments from both sides of the fence. One thing that bothers me a little is that the textual alteration does not concern any text created by Bach or his contemporaries but that of John the evang...
Comment: Re: Bach St. Matthew: First Chorus
I think the idea of dialogue is so central to the work that I would suggest that sacrificing some sound to strengthen the feeling of dialogue might be worth while. Also, I believe Bach wrote a feeling of growth into the texture of the first chorus; he builds his cathedral brick by brick, as it wer...
Comment: Re: How to conduct a renaissance piece with no barlines or meter?
In the sixteenth century, the choirmaster or one of the singers beat a tactus (down-up movement of the hand). In binary time, the down and up movements were equal in duration; in ternary time the down movement twice as long as the up movement (this was realized by stopping the hand at the bottom)....
Comment: Re: Need for Beat Patterns?
It's always brilliant when someone challenges the prevailing paradigm! I would like to point out two things. 1. Beat patterns mostly organise movements in sequences of directions. What are the benefits of this activity? - the performers can follow where the conductor is. Typical benefit for in...
Comment: Re: 8 part Madrigals - SSAATTBB?
Here is a couple:   Andrea Gabrieli                                         Battaglia (Concerti di Andrea et di Giovanni Gabrieli, 1587)   Heinrich Schütz  Vasto mar from the Italian Madrigal Book  
Comment: Re: The Best not-so-well-known major works
All the Handel oratorios barring The Messiah (which I rule out as well-known and not through lack of quality:), especially: Israel in Egypt Jephtha (his best?) Solomon Saul Alexander's Feast   The Requiems by André Campra and Jean Gilles are also wonderful.   Kari Turunen Fi...
Comment: Re: Music about angels
Die erste Elegie by Einojuhani Rutavaara (FennicaGehrman) if you want strong, masculine angels. 10 minutes long SATB with divisi. A brilliant if demanding piece. And the poem is a classic in its own right: the first poem of  Rilke's Duino Elegies.   Kari Turunen
Comment: Re: Mozart Requiem Tempo issues: Why so Slow?!?
  I am not a specialist of eighteenth-century music but I have my suspicions about the direct 1:2 ratio of the cut time signatures to the undiminished time signatures. At least the late sixteenth-century sources seem to pretty much agree that the relationship is not direct and that the tactus o...
Comment: Re: Tormis translation?
How about asking the Tapiola Choir if they have a translation? www.tapiolankuoro.fi/en    
Comment: Re: scandinavian choirs
No official figures for the whole population in Finland. There was a survey in the 1990s that reported 19% of young women between 10 ann 19 years singing in choirs - but this group is not representative for the whole population. We have estimated that nationally around 100 000 Finns (of ca. 5 millio...
Comment: Re: Palestrina - Missa sine Nomine - called 'Manuana'
The Duke of Mnatua, Guglielmo Gonzaga commissioned 12 masses (the number is debated) from Palestrina in 1578 for use at his chapel (Santa Barbara). They were alternatim in style, i.e. they consist of polyphonic passages and passages in plainchant. Palestrina was at the same time working on a renovat...
Comment: Re: Why do most american choral conductors ignore the period 1500-1700?
I am all for historically informed performance - actually I am working on a DMA in perfromance practice - but if it means restricting the perfromance of early music to specialists, I think something has gone quite wrong. First of all, there is very little unambiguous data from the past. Secondly, ...
Comment: Re: Why do most american choral conductors ignore the period 1500-1700?
Robert,   it is not just an american phenomenon. I was not the only one who noticed the absence of Renaissance polyphony from the IFCM Symposium in Copenhagen. I am afraid conductors seem to be timid about perfoming Renaissance music, probably thinking you need a specific training in the music. It ...
Comment: Re: dividing the divisi (in small ensemble)
Having sung in an eight-voice ensemble for the last 15 years, I would like to encourage you to do whatever you feel most comfortable with, what your intuition says. You can't really plan for catastrophes, they happen whatever you do. And it is amazing how you learn to deal with those times when some...
Comment: Re: Looking for Repertoire Suggestions Related to Dreams
Dear Jason,   just a few quick ones:   Edward Elgar: Serenade (Dreams all too brief...) Gerald Finzi: Clear and gentle stream (Robert Bridges;  "the idle dream of my boyish day...) Finzi: Nightingales (Bridges; [we] dream while the innumarable choir of day welcome the dawn.)   The refences in ...
Comment: Re: last rehearsal before competition - any tips?
I suggest you begin by working on the problematic bits and then let them sing through more and more. I think the best pep talk I've given is a reference to the Lion King. At the end Simba stands near the ledge he is meant to stand on to take on his role as king. He is apparently terrified. The old w...