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Items by Jerome Hoberman

Results: 184
Title Author Date
Comment: Re: Query re music on saints' names
Many thanks to Allen Simon, John Wexler, Brian Holmes, Bruce Borton and Robert Grandy for their thoughtful and interesting suggestions. I'm still working on it...   Best regards, Jerome Hoberman   Music Director/Conductor, The Hong Kong Bach Choir & Orchestra
Forum message: Query re music on saints' names
Dear Colleagues,   For a future (secular, concert hall) program that will include a new work on St. Cecilia, I'm seeking suggestions for mixed choral works whose text-subjects have something to do with particular saints.   Criteria: Length - 5' to 45' Instrumentation - can be 0 to 20 players...
Comment: Re: Taking the "Christ" out of "Ubi Caritas"?
I write as a Jew, brought up and schooled in an Orthodox environment (in the US), no longer religiously observant though still maintaining a connection to the synagogue by directing a High Holiday choir. Perhaps some comments from a somewhat different point of view to those that have been heard so f...
Comment: Re: Convocation/Commencement Anthems SATB high school level
Michael A. Gray wrote, "Does anyone ever do Rodgers' 'You'll Never Walk Alone' anymore?"   No doubt they do -- and frequently -- in Liverpool.
Comment: Re: Estonian pronunciation guide
The best resource would be a living, walking, talking Estonian. They do exist, though not everywhere (it's a small country, and "everywhere" might spread them too thinly). We were fortunate last season when performing Tormis to have the assistance of a native Estonian speaker, who, while providing m...
Comment: Re: Hallelujah Chorus
There was something of a convention in Baroque music, when a phrase was repeated immediately and identically, to vary its dynamic. On occasion, composers even wrote contrasting forte/piano markings. (Which begs the question, if they felt the need to mark the dynamics, was it really such a convention...
Comment: Re: Haydn "The Creation" Schirmer English Translation
I realize that the original query concerned the Schirmer edition, but please forgive me for writing that I think the Nicholas Temperley edition/translation (published by Peters) is superior to any other English re-translation I know of (including Shaw-Parker/Lawson-Gould) -- making the originally-pu...
Comment: Re: Lithuanian Music Help!
The Miskinis "Laudate pueri, Domine" is also very beautiful, and not exceptionally difficult to learn on short notice. Especially good if the remainder of the program includes some ear-and-mind-challenging works for the audience -- it's quite soothing, though also uplifting.   Best regards, Jero...
Comment: Re: Exciting extended sacred works from 20th-21st Century composers
The chamber-orchestra version of Le Roi David is, I think, better than the revision for (too-)large orchestra. It's a magnificent piece, and if you can find a truly mesmerizing actor for the Witch of Endor you'll really knock the audience out.   But it's a Jewish text -- don't know if that would ...
Comment: Re: Repertoire for a "Parodies and PDQ" Concert
Re PDQ Bach:   "I'm not really keen on those of his that are simply humorous."   I haven't seen anything of PDQ Bach, in any genre, that is simply humorous and not parody (parody in the contemporary-usage sense, not as in JS's Christmas Oratorio). But you have to be able to recognize what's be...
Comment: Re: In praise of the sun
With regard to mixed-chorus pieces in praise of the sun, you don't mention the size or the musical/intellectual level of your chorus, but...   Sofia Gubaidulina's Canticle of the Sun, for chorus, solo cello, 2 percussionists and celesta. 45 minutes, written for Rostropovich.   Best regards, J...
Comment: Re: The Young Conductor III - learning repertoire
Richard Sparks writes:   "Go to concerts. If the symphony nearby is doing a choral/orchestral work you don't know--go! If another college choir comes to town on tour--go! If there's a good church choir doing a concert--go! Just go and listen and learn."   While applauding energetically his adv...
Comment: Re: Paying Vocal Soloists for Commercial Recording
When I was A&R manager for a well-known international commercial classical label about a dozen or so years ago, the going rate was fixed at US$2,000 per soloist, as I recall. I'd imagine it may have gone up since then. That assumes their names are on the cover. For unacknowledged (backing) music...
Comment: Re: This Instrumental Teacher Needs Help With Sight Singing Materials
I think the following have never been superceded:   Hindemith's "Elementary Training for Musicians" Dandelot's "Manuel pratique (pour l'etude des cles sol fa ut)" and the series, originally by Lemoine and Carulli, "Solfege des solfeges"   My (amateur) choir includes singers of more than a doz...
Comment: Re: issues of concert programming
Have you checked RILM?
Comment: Re: Audition Advice
I hope it's not to late to comment usefully.   Without going so far as to say that video recording would be a problem for me you might point out that videos give a deceptive impression of an interaction that depends on physical presence. A conductor's success or failure, after all, depends at lea...
Comment: Re: Mozart Requiem
Re John Hoffacker's report on his performance of the Requiem preceded not by other music but by a multi-media examination of the Mozart:   It seems to me that this wasn't a full concert, but a curated museum exhibition followed by a 50-minute performance. The distinction is important, I think, be...
Comment: Re: Mozart Requiem
Chris Bowman asks whether the Mozart Requiem is traditionally done as the only piece on a concert.   There are many types of concerts and you don't say what the context is of yours, or the venue, performers and audience, or the edition. But a good guideline for a mainstream public concert is an a...
Comment: Re: Triangle articulation symbol in Rossini score
I don't know about Ricordi and Kalmus (or "etc"), but Carus is a critical edition based on the autograph for 2 pianos and harmonium, with the first edition and another manuscript held in the Brussels Royal Conservatory's library -- different from the second manuscript that Gossett used but apparentl...
Comment: Re: Repertoire Suggestions for Independence of Spirit
Excuse me, but, what does "independence of spirit" mean?   Thanks, and best regards, Jerome Hoberman   Music Director/Conductor, The Hong Kong Bach Choir & Orchestra
Comment: Re: Triangle articulation symbol in Rossini score
Re strange articulation mark in Rossini's Petitte Messe solennelle:   I've only ever used the Klaus Doege edition published by Carus, so I can't answer authoritatively, but have you checked the kritische Berichte for the Brauner/Gossett?   Ah, I just had a lo...
Comment: Re: Classical/Romantic programming ideas
Andrew Megill offered a good and thorough list. I might add the Bruckner Te Deum and some of the Cherubini masses.   Best regards, Jerome Hoberman   Music Director/Conductor, The Hong Kong Bach Choir & Orchestra
Comment: Re: Bach's Missa in B Minor
Here's where I need to clarify my previous post, or perhaps Bart Brush and I differ in our understandings of how the classical music game is played. I wouldn't say that the ultimate goal is to recreate -- or even realize -- Bach's intentions; the goal is to realize -- or recreate -- Bach's text. The...
Comment: Re: Bach's Missa in B Minor
Bart Brush writes about 'the old joke, told in both jazz and folk music circles: "Can you read music?" "Not enough to hurt my playing."'   Notice that this joke is related as being told in 'jazz and folk music circles.' Bach, however, is playing a different game, one with different rules. In this...
Comment: Re: Mozart Coronation Mass - New Edition
Dear Mr. McIntosh,   Congratulations on completing your performing edition of the Coronation Mass. May I ask, respectfully, how it is an improvement on Monika Holl's for Baerenreiter/Carus and why it should be preferred to that now-standard edition?   Thank you, and best regards, Jerome Hober...
Comment: Re: teaching the concept of a glottal stop to church choir
Julie Ford asks about addressing "the concept of glottal stop" with her choir.   May I suggest that you don't need to teach the concept of glottal stops (or even glottal onsets) to your choir, unless your aim is to train technical experts rather than to make music. What you need to do is cause th...
Comment: Re: Barber Agnus Dei/Adagio question
William Copper writes that the arrangement for choir is not by Barber, and has [since] been altered. (I'm paraphrasing only the factual parts of his post, not the opinionated ones.)   I'm wondering if Mr. Copper can enlighten his readers by providing documentation or other evidence for those two ...
Comment: Re: What, if anything, can be programmed with "Carmina Burana"
Do remember that Carmina burana was composed during the mid-1930s, in Nazi Germany, by a composer who if not an enthusiast was at least a willing collaborator, and was one of the rare contemporary works that (if not at first, then eventually) was enthusiastically approved and promoted by the Party. ...
Comment: Re: Rhythm training
The question is about resources to help singers work on rhythm away from rehearsal, without a keyboard.   Hindemith's Elementary Training for Musicians has never significanlty been improved upon.  That, plus a metronome, set to a relatively slow tempo, whose click is imagined as off-beats (eithe...
Comment: Re: Rossini- Petite Messe Solenelle
I use the Carus scores and parts.  It's a critical urtext edition with a pretty thorough introductory essay and critical notes, well printed and easily legible.  Any edition that has just two keyboards is based on a corrupt source.  The only legitimate (from Rossini's own hand) editions are the t...
Comment: Re: Eric Whitacre conferences and Virtual Choirs
Are there really "virtual choirs" (in any significant numbers) or only "Eric Whitacre virtual choirs"?  That is, is what we're talking about a genuine phenomenon to which attention must be paid, or is it merely a self-promotional vehicle for one easy-listening, intellectually undemanding, middlebro...
Comment: Re: Eric Whitacre conferences and Virtual Choirs
Dear Jayson,   Perhaps it would help to think of it this way:   "virtual (adjective) 1. being such in power, force, or effect, though not actually or expressly such: a virtual dependence on charity. 2. Optics. a. noting an image formed by the apparent convergence of rays geometrically, but ...
Comment: Re: The Repertoire for Fall Semester
Dear Soohyun Son,   I haven't been in charge of a group exactly like the one you describe, but I have had responsibility for untrained voices, some of whose possessors are musically illiterate. Given that...   1. I'd guess that 60 minutes of music might be a maximum limit, perhaps as little as...
Comment: Re: companion piece(s) to Stravinsky "Les Noces"
I once considered pairing Les Noces not with Carmina burana, but with Catulli carmina, which, unlike Carmina burana, was written originally for piano and percussion (lots of the latter).  But I thought better of it: Orff owes a lot to Stravinsky, but in a vastly simplified (simplistified?) way; alt...
Comment: Re: Misa Criolla by Ramirez
Not sure what Andrew Brown means by "you will need to orchestrate it if you want to have anything other than piano accompanying." The instrumentation is clear in the (in places, inaccurate) Lawson-Gould/Alfred/Belwin octavo-size score, and the hire parts are readily available.  The percussion -- b...
Comment: Re: Performance order for concert coming up!
Donna Ransdell asks advice about the order in which to program certain pieces.   I reply, without any intention whatsoever to insult or demean Donna or anyone reading this:   The Internet is a far too easy means of getting cheap information, robbing you of the essential experience of strugglin...
Comment: Re: IPA - Why do we recreate the wheel every time?
Freeman Dryden suggests that Lee Kesselman meant "translation" rather than "transcription." Um, wouldn't that be "transliteration?"  Or are you assuming the International Phonetic Alphabet is a language?   My real question is to Lee Kesselman, about why, if he provides IPA transliterations of t...
Comment: Re: Programming Assistance Needed
Dear Clinton,   Perhaps your task would seem less daunting if you approached it differently.  Instead of beginning by choosing a "theme" for your program, why not think of, say, two works that speak so strongly to (and potentially through) you that you are certain you can do them better than any...
Comment: Re: Why all musicians/music majors need sight singing/aural skills
Dear Mr/Ms. Banks,   Sight-singing is an exercise in and demonstration of music literacy, as reading aloud is an exercise in and demonstration of verbal literacy.  For musicians, literacy is defined as the ability to hear accurately in one's imagination what one sees in a score.  Anything short...
Comment: Re: College Piece for a Learning Conductor
Have a look at William Schuman's "Carols of Death" -- 3 unaccompanied songs to Whitman texts; can be done individually (you didn't mention duration), and will challenge both you and the singers both musically and technically.  Published by Merion Music (a Presser imprint).   Best regards, Jerom...
Comment: Re: GradMusic.Org - Where are Choral Directors studying?
Alan Davis collected statistics on 4,833 postgraduate choral-conducting students.   I'm astonished that there are no choral conducting students anywhere in the world except the US! What do all the rest do -- sit around and mope?   Best regards, Jerome Hoberman   Music Director/Con...
Comment: Re: Advice for MM choral conducting audition
Jessica Taber asks about preparing for MM auditions for choral conducting.   For the audition proper, remember that the committee doesn't expect to see a finished conductor -- otherwise, why would you be there? What they do want to see, however, is evidence of the compelling musicianship and ...
Comment: Re: Song of Songs
Koen Vits asks about repertory using texts from the Song of Songs.   William Billings' "I am the Rose of Sharon." It's not exactly folk music, but is so engrained in the foundations of the American canon as to be almost that.   Best regards, Jerome Hoberman   Music Director/Conduc...
Comment: Re: Choral music with clapping
Jaakko Mantyjarvi's El Hambo.   Best regards, Jerome Hoberman   Music Director/Conductor, The Hong Kong Bach Choir & Orchestra
Comment: Re: JSB st matt passion movement 1 children's choir part?
David Janower asks about the "children's choir" part in the St. Matthew Passion.   Not to suggest that the chorale melody in the opening chorus shouldn't be sung by them as it so often is, but the line isn't for children's or boys' choir any more (or less) than the entire soprano and alto par...
Comment: Re: Bach's Christmas Oratorio
We're performing the Christmas Oratorio complete in one (very long) evening next December.  Considering an early start time and an extra-long intermission with time for eating as concessions to its length, which is still less than that of the St Matthew Passion.  Will let you know then, but that...
Comment: Re: What is the most perfect piece of choral music ever composed? Opinions, please.
Piers Maxim writes: "...Hear my Prayer, Purcell.  It doesn't get any better than this: 8 part unaccompanied voices, 2 motives intertwining to build to a shattering climax, false relations and all: heaven on earth!  No wonder he (possibly) could not continue..."   Maybe Purcell couldn't, b...
Comment: Re: What is the most perfect piece of choral music ever composed? Opinions, please.
I, too, find this thread interesting, less for its accumulation of a collection of works that certain people find "perfect" than for what it suggests about how we judge. I wonder if some who replied to the query are equating perfection with personal preference: that is, confusing an objective stat...
Comment: Re: "handshakes of separation"?
I realize that Frank Albinder isn't vouching for the accuracy of his quotes, but Schnabel was only 4 when Liszt died, so that connection is unlikely.  He did, however, study with Leschitizky, who studied with Czerny, who actually studied with Beethoven (Liszt having only been kissed by Beethoven ...
Forum message: Hans Werner Henze
Are any of you familiar with -- and, if so, able and willing to give advice on -- choral works by Henze?  In particular, the "Five Madrigals," "Cantata della fiaba estrema" and/or "Lieder von einer Insel."   Many thanks in advance for your thoughts.   Best regards, Jerome Hoberman ...