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Latin translation

Crie de choeur to Latin Scholars amongst us

I get the rough idea but please would someone kindly give me an appropriate
translation for:

Spiritus quidem promptus est caro autem infirma fiat voluntaa tua.

The words come from the Palestrina motet "In monte Olivetti" and follow on
from 'oravit ad paterm: Pater, si fieri potest transeat a me calix iste'
which is all fairly obvious once you know that a 'calix' is a cup.

I can't remember the identity of the Choraltalker who has given such
splendid translations in the past, but I do hope you are still out there in
Choral Talk Land. I'd be most appreciative.

Leigh Wigglesworth
'Elation' Choir Director, Melbourne, Australia

on May 12, 2002 3:43am
In article ,
Choraltalk Gateway writes
>Crie de choeur to Latin Scholars amongst us
>
>I get the rough idea but please would someone kindly give me an appropriate
>translation for:
>
>Spiritus quidem promptus est caro autem infirma fiat voluntaa tua.

The spirit is willing, but the flesh is weak: Thy will be done. And
it's "voluntas", not "voluntaa".

Robert "Sleep, Fleshly Birth" Ramsey's version of "In monte Oliveti" is
also a nice piece.
--
MegaMole, the Official Enrico Basilica
\\\\\ laaa! mole(a)lspace.org mole(a)music.slut.org.uk
\\\\\\\_o / www.countertenor.demon.co.uk for Stuff
__ \\\\\'c/__ Hitting the high notes with hedgehogs since 2001

on May 12, 2002 6:43am
Spiritus quidem promptus est:
-- The Spirit indeed is willing
caro autem infirma
-- but the flesh is weak.
Fiat voluntas tua.
-- Thy will be done.
(note: voluntas, not voluntaa;
also note: "Fiat voluntas tua" is a separate sentence from the preceding
one.)

This text, and all the others, is from the Gospel accounts of the agony of
Jesus in the Garden of Olives, or the Garden of Gethsemane, which is on
Mount Olivet (in monte Oliveti -- note: not Olivetti, which is the name of
a typewriter and computer company in Italy!).


"Choraltalk Gateway" wrote in message
news:3.0.5.32.20020511132122.008106d0(a)mail.vicnet.net.au...
> Crie de choeur to Latin Scholars amongst us
>
> I get the rough idea but please would someone kindly give me an
appropriate
> translation for:
>
> Spiritus quidem promptus est caro autem infirma fiat voluntaa tua.
>
> The words come from the Palestrina motet "In monte Olivetti" and follow on
> from 'oravit ad paterm: Pater, si fieri potest transeat a me calix iste'
> which is all fairly obvious once you know that a 'calix' is a cup.
>
> I can't remember the identity of the Choraltalker who has given such
> splendid translations in the past, but I do hope you are still out there
in
> Choral Talk Land. I'd be most appreciative.
>
> Leigh Wigglesworth
> 'Elation' Choir Director, Melbourne, Australia
>


on May 14, 2002 6:51am
I am having trouble locating an English translation of the Latin text
below. It is the text of the song, "River," from the motion picture,
"The Mission." I'd appreciate any assistance!

Thanks,

Deb Baur

***

Vita, vita nostra
Tellus nostra vita nostra
Sic clamant.

Poena, poena nostra
Vires nostra poena nostra
Sic clamant.

Ira, ira nostra
Fides nostra ira nostra
Sic clamant.

Vita, vita nostra
Tellus nostra vita nostra
Sic clamant.

Poena, poena nostra
Vires nostra poena nostra
Sic clamant.



on May 14, 2002 10:43am
> -----Original Message-----
> From: owner-choraltalk(a)lists.colorado.edu [mailto:owner-
> choraltalk(a)lists.colorado.edu] On Behalf Of shunil borpujari
> Sent: 14-May-02 11:52
> To: choraltalk(a)lists.colorado.edu
> Subject: Latin translation
>
> I am having trouble locating an English translation of the Latin text
> below. It is the text of the song, "River," from the motion picture,
> "The Mission." I'd appreciate any assistance!
>
> Thanks,
>
> Deb Baur
>
> ***
Hi:

The words are quite simple. The problem is figuring out what they mean
when they are strung together.

> Vita, vita nostra Tellus nostra vita nostra Sic clamant.
Our life, our earth, our life cry out (or call out, or proclaim) thus.

> Poena, poena nostra Vires nostra poena nostra Sic clamant.
Our punishment (or perhaps, suffering), our powers (or strength), our
punishment cry out thus.

> Ira, ira nostra Fides nostra ira nostra Sic clamant.
Our anger, our faith, our anger cry out thus.

"Sic" means "thus", but can also mean "Yes". Perhaps the sentences are
to be understood as saying "...cry out 'Yes'".

That's the best I can do.

Michael Hartney
Ottawa (ON) Canada
hartneym(a)magma.ca


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