Golden Gate Festival
Advertise on ChoralNet 
ChoralNet logo
The mission of the ACDA is to inspire excellence in choral music through education, performance, composition, and advocacy.

How to Say No to an Auditionee (Rejection Letters)


Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 09:43:43 -0700
From: Tom Cunningham <100071.2057@compuserve.com>
Subject: How do you say no to an auditionee?

I'd like to ask your help with this difficult situation.
I conduct a large 150-voice choral society, all unpaid
volunteers. We get a lot of applicants and typically
accept about half based on an audition. We send a letter
to each candidate afterwards and we've been told
that our current "no" letter is too blunt.
I'm trying to draft a new one and would welcome any
good (preferably tried and tested) ideas.

---start of draft---

Dear X,

We are very sorry to have to tell you that you were not
successful in your audition to join the XXX Choral Society.

As there is no objective measurement of a singer's
capabilities, the decision of the auditioning panel is
inevitably subjective. In some cases the panel may feel that
a particular voice, no matter how experienced, is just not
right for the sound of this choir. That same voice may be
absolutely right for another choir or indeed as a soloist.
We regret that we are unable to discuss the reasons for our
decision.

If you are looking for another choir in this area, we know of
several choirs which you may like to consider joining.
These are:

(include any amateur choirs we know)

On behalf of the XXX Choral Society, I should like to thank
you for coming to audition for us.

Yours sincerely,

A.B.C
(Membership Secretary)

---end of draft---
-----------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 10:33:44 -0700
From: jmcrowell@ucdavis.edu (John M. Crowell)
Subject: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

Well, off the top of my head, without much analysis, I'd have to agree
that it is pretty blunt. If nothing else, the first thing I'd change
is the opening sentence. The very first thing to do is THANK the person
for auditioning!

Since you apparently need to use a form letter (presumably because of the
sheer number of rejections you must send), there's not much point in the
sentence:

> We regret that we are unable to discuss the reasons for our
> decision.

If I were to receive this letter, I'd have read that sentence as

"We can't be bothered. You're not even important enough
for us to tell you why we don't want you."

I guess, IMHO the general tone of the letter is "impolite." I'm sure
others will have better suggestions than I on how to make it "nicer."
---------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 10-Feb-95 18:35 CET
From: Paul Lawrence Hondorp > INTERNET:phondorp@violin.aix.calpoly.edu
Reply to: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

> Dear X,
>
> We are very sorry to have to tell you that you were not
> successful in your audition to join the XXX Choral Society.

How about starting with something a bit more positive....

Thank you for auditioning for thexxxxxxxx choir. We were fortunate to
have a large number of qualified singers from which to choose.

After hearing all xxx auditionees, we chose a balanced
choir of xx voices. > As there is no objective measurement of a singer's
> capabilities, the decision of the auditioning panel is
> inevitably subjective. In some cases the panel may feel that
> a particular voice, no matter how experienced, is just not
> right for the sound of this choir. That same voice may be
> absolutely right for another choir or indeed as a soloist.
> We regret that we are unable to discuss the reasons for our
> decision.
>
> If you are looking for another choir in this area, we know of
> several choirs which you may like to consider joining.
> These are:
>
> (include any amateur choirs we know)
>
> On behalf of the XXX Choral Society, I should like to thank
> you for coming to audition for us.
>
> Yours sincerely,
>
> A.B.C
> (Membership Secretary)
>


I think the phrasing of the first paragraph is most important. At least
a positive thought there softens the blow more than "you were not
successful...."
-------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 10-Feb-95 19:43 CET
From: GESTON MARY KATHRYN > INTERNET:geston@ucsu.Colorado.EDU
Reply to: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

I'd have to agree with the assessment of your current letter. You may
find the following suggestions to be of help. I've found that trying to
explain subjectivity via the written word can sound extremely
impersonal and insincere. You do, after all, want to encourage the
continued audience participation of those who don't make it, rather than
get them so angry that they'll never come to another concert.

Dear X,

The first thing you should say is "thanks":

Thank you for auditioning for the XXX Choral Society.

Then something like this:

Many excellent singers took part in the audition process.
OR, POSSIBLY,
More than one hundred area singers took part in the recent auditions.

Then the bad news (with no explanations about subjectivity, "rightness"
of voice for the group, etc. They know they didn't make it and
over-explaining doesn't make it any easier.):

Regretfully, the XXX Choral Society does not have an opening for
you at this time.

You might close with something like this:

We do value your interest in the group and hope that you will continue
to support the musical endeavors of the XXX Choral Society. Your name
will be retained on our mailing list so that you may be informed of
upcoming concerts. Again, thank you for your interest and audition.

Skip the stuff about other groups. It sounds a bit uppity (i.e., "you
weren't good enough for us, but here are some other groups that might
have you.") Short and polite. I recommend "Best wishes" instead of "Yours
sincerely."
--------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 10-Feb-95 22:10 CET
From: Cindi Roden > INTERNET:RODEN@GUVM.CCF.GEORGETOWN.EDU
Reply to: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

Speaking as someone who has both been accepted and turned down by various
choirs, I want to say that you're one the right track by wanting to respond
and being willing to take the time to think about your response. Lots of
choir directors SAY they will call and then they simply DON'T, from which
I guess one is supposed to assume that one was not accepted, and please don't
bother them. I've even left messages, asking very nicely what their
decision was, and been ignored - talk about RUDE.

If at all possible, I think it's best to tell people as soon as possible,
even at the audition if you know then - and you probably do. And I think
if it's after the fact, a phone call is always nicer than a letter. What
I've heard done is for the director to kindly explain that the person needs
more experience before they are ready for this particular choir - more
voice training/development, more sight reading ability, more work on
getting their pitches more exact, etc. - whatever they need in order to get
to the required level, rather than just letting them think that you think
they are a lousy singer. The other thing that's nice is to mention groups
that are more at a 'learning' level, just as you are doing in your letter.
Somebody more experienced whose tone quality is not right to suit the choir
(too operatic or whatever) is going to understand when you explain that -
they probably knew it anyway.

I do agree that the letter is really cold, esp. the part about not discussing
why. That's always what we want to know most - WHY didn't I get in, and
what can I do about it so that I don't get turned down next time? What
particular sound IS it that you are looking for? What suggestions do you
have for me - can you recommend a teacher? That sort of thing. One choir
that turned me down very nicely did it by saying I was one of several
people who they felt would have worked out and they would like to audition
me again sometime, but they had only had one opening and they had given it
to someone who had previously sung professionally. I could certainly
understand that and had no problem with it at all; and I would gladly
audition for them again. Another, though, told me at the audition they
thought I would work out fine and they would call to confirm; but never
called and didn't return my calls; and them I would NEVER try for again,
or even attend one of their concerts.
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 12:42:33 -0700
From: promza@saunix.sau.edu (Patricia Romza)
Subject: thank you but letter

I agree with John that the first thing you should do is thank them, not
make them feel inadequate. Also, there is a hidden potential for giving
offense in your suggestion of other choirs; what if you don't list a choir
because you don't know of it? What if a listed choir's
director/board/members finds out about your listing and is offended that
you would offer them your 'dregs'? By letting the auditioner make the
first move of calling and asking for other choirs, you avoid the above.
But I would think that this would require that your membership secretary be
an extremely gracious person who would know how to respond tactfully if the
auditioner gets huffy and wants to know why he/she wasn't chosen.

I have been involved in this situation and it is very difficult to say
'thank you, but' without insulting the person. I found that the least
said, the best. Below I offer my 'thank you, but' letter with variants of
your second and third paragraphs. Having received enough 'thank you, but'
letters in academic job-hunting (many of which were downright impolite, as
if the person's mother hadn't taught them any manners!), I know I don't
want to read further than the thank you for auditioning and the regret;
IMHO, anything else feels like excuses drummed up to make me feel better.
But maybe some people prefer it. No matter what you say, the bottom line
will feel like "they thought I wasn't good enough" no matter how you say
it, but it is more professional and personable to do it politely.


Dear X,

The XXX Choral Society would like to thank you for auditioning for
membership. As usual, the pool of singers was of a very high calibre and
our decisions were difficult. I are very sorry to have to tell you that we
are unable to accept you as member at this time.
___________
Our auditioning panel is charged with deciding which of the many singers we
hear will fit into the present sound and nature of our ensemble. In some
cases the panel may feel that a particular voice, no matter how
experienced, is just not right for the sound of this choir. That same
voice may be absolutely right for another choir or indeed as a soloist.

There are several other choirs in this area that you may wish to consider
joining. As membership secretary I would be pleased to provide names and
contact information.
___________
Again, on behalf of the XXX Choral Society, I should like to thank
you for auditioning for us.


I'd like to see other director's responses to this as well.
----------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 13:24:33 -0700
From: "D. BRENT BALLWEG"
Subject: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

"Blunt" might be too nice of a word. We all take rejection VERY
hard, it's just our human nature. It's important that within a form
letter, we still try to be as personable and understanding as
possible.

> We are very sorry to have to tell you that you were not
> successful in your audition to join the XXX Choral Society.

I would strike this opening sentence completely. What's
"successful"? And perhaps they had a good voice but you already
have 57 2nd sopranos! Begin by recognizing their effort and showing
your appreciation. This tends to "soften the blow". I tend to start
my audition responses (BTW, both "yes" and "no" letters) with
something like:

"Thank you so much for taking time from your schedule to come and
audition for the XXX Choral Society. I genuinely enjoyed getting to
meet you and hear you sing!"

> As there is no objective measurement of a singer's capabilities,
>the decision of the auditioning panel is inevitably subjective. In
>some cases the panel may feel that a particular voice, no matter how
>experienced, is just not right for the sound of this choir. That
>same voice may be absolutely right for another choir or indeed as a
>soloist.

This is okay, although it tends to emphasize THEIR voice not fitting
"our" choir. To try to take the "blame" off of their voice, I try to
emphasize that it might be more a matter of the choir's limitations,
i.e.:

"Unfortunately, at this time, we won't be able to add you to the
choir. Please understand that this is not necessarily a reflection
of your talent, but rather on the limited number of openings in the
ensemble."

>We regret that we are unable to discuss the reasons for our
>decision.

Strike this. Again, this is a personal blow. If they want to talk,
you owe it to them.

> If you are looking for another choir in this area, we know of
> several choirs which you may like to consider joining.
> These are:
>
> (include any amateur choirs we know)

For whatever reasons, I find this unnecessary. It seems to say,
"you're not good enough for our choir, but these choirs of lesser
quality might be able to use you."

> On behalf of the XXX Choral Society, I should like to thank
> you for coming to audition for us.

Absolutely, thank them again. Try to leave as pleasant a taste as
possible. You never know, perhaps at another time they might be just
what you're looking for.

I'm very sympathetic with your desire to create a better letter. You
should be applauded for wanting input from others. I think that we
have all found it to be very hard to have to say "no."
-------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Fri, 10 Feb 1995 14:05:08 -0700
From: To: fuller@sci.obu.edu
Subject: "Thanks, but no thanks" letter

I agree fully with both the previous responses to your dilema. It is
indeed difficult to respond to auditionees who have not been selected for
an ensemble and we have a professional (and personal) responsibility to
handle each person with care as well as integrity. I would suggest you
avoid saying that the person was not "successful" in their audition. They
may not have been successful in being selected, but may have actually
performed with great success in terms of their musical gifts. I think it
is usually helpful to also qualify the response with the words, "at this
time." It may be that you would like to consider that singer at a later
audition. If so, they should know that. Otherwise, you may never hear
from them again. Community public relations also could become a factor.
The way you deal with people can actually affect your audience, certainly
over a period of years.
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
Date: 10-Feb-95 23:06 CET
From: Douglas Fullington > INTERNET:dougf@u.washington.edu
Reply to: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

Rather than stating that the individual was "not successful," you might
simply say that they were "not selected." Success is a very subjective term.

Stating that you are happy to provide a list of alternative choirs may be
more appropriate than listing the choirs. Listing the choirs might imply
that they are choirs of lesser quality than your own, particularly in
light of the "not successful" sentence.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 11-Feb-95 01:01 CET
From: INTERNET:ADFN31A@prodigy.com
Reply to: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

I have stopped sending letters, acceptance or rejection. I now make my
decision at the time of the audition and tell them at that time. I feel
that it gives them the opportunity to ask questions and get answers from a
person. Agreed, it takes longer but I find it's worth the time. I like to
explain the reasons for my decision.

Several times I have heard a really fine voice that lacks the reading
skills that we require. I'll tell them that and suggest a reading teacher
and offer a new audition, sight reading only, when they feel they can meet
the requirements. I have had people return as many as three times before
being accepted. Some of these people are the most dedicated since they
have really worked to get in. I have now begun doing the same with good
musicians that have vocal problems. It's paying off.
---------------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Sat, 11 Feb 95 10:35:00 -0500
From: grace.lee@factory.com (Grace Lee)
To: choralist@lists.colorado.edu

CC> volunteers. We get a lot of applicants and typically accept
CC> about half based on an audition. We send a letter to each
CC> candidate afterwards and we've been told that our current
CC> "no" letter is too blunt.

Tom, our letter is very brief but only cites the need
for vocal balance between sections. If you need the
exact language please email me.
------------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 11-Feb-95 02:30 CET
From: Martin Hook > INTERNET:mhook01@bigcat.missouri.edu
Reply to: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

It looks fine to me. It's hard not to hurt one's feelings in a situation
like this. My only suggestion might be to start with something like,
"Thank you for your time and interest in auditioning for XXX choir. As
you know, highly capable singers like yourself are what make XXX choir so
successful. We regret..."
------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 12-Feb-95 06:02 CET
From: Paul Sinasohn > INTERNET:sinasohn@netcom.com
Reply to: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

How about this:

Dear X

Thank you for auditioning for the XXX choir. We regret that at this time
we are not able to offer you membership in our choir. While we cannot and
will not discuss the reasons for not accepting a particular singer, the
most common situation is that our vocal quality and our goals would be
detrimental to your voice. This is not a reflection on your ability as a
singer or the quality of your voice. There is just not a good match at
this time. We encourage you to investigate other choirs in the local
area, including the following:


and continue on

Say thank you FIRST. A little bit of sugar helps the medicine go down (M.
Poppins)
------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 13 Feb 1995 22:35:52 -0700
From: Mark C Aamot
Subject: thank you

Jumping in on the discussion of letters to people who audition for your
community chorus - I have gone away from letters and have our membership
chairperson call and tell the person the result of the adution. They explain
our openings and tell them if they would like to talk with me to give me a call.
I keep all the sheets so I can tell them why they were not selected this time.
------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: 14-Feb-95 06:33 CET
From: INTERNET:John.Howell@vt.edu
Reply to: Re: How do you say no to an auditionee?

Sorry for the late reply, but I've been in this situation myself and
appreciate what you are going through. I've tried to think of the best
advice I can give, and decided that simply describing my situation and how
I handled it might turn up an idea or two that you can use. My situation
differs in that it involved the entertainment side of the music game, but
the human emotions and feelings are exactly the same. Only some of the
criteria are different; we auditioned for dance ability as well as vocal,
and had to keep physical condition in mind because of the dancing.

To set the scene, although I am no longer doing so, I spent 15 years
directing a very popular and very well-known university show ensemble.
Many students were attracted to it and went through my auditions. Many had
to be turned down, and I had to come up with a positive way of doing so.

The winter before I came to this job, I directed the nationawide vocal
auditions for Walt Disney Productions' summer collegiate program, the All
American College Singers. I heard 1,280 singers, and had to pick a total
of 28--14 for each theme park. I learned a LOT from that experience, some
of it just because of the Disney philosophy, and have put what I learned to
use ever since.

As you probably know, professional auditions (union or non-union) are based
on "cutting." A typical "open" audition (also known as a "cattle call")
can draw 800-1,000 applicants in a single day. The only way to get through
that many people is to cut, first by appearance and suitability for the
role, then by a very brief dance combination, and only then start listening
to individual readings and songs. The philosophy in our Disney auditions
was totally different. We took care to see that every applicant got a FULL
audition, even the ones who didn't have a chance. It was important to
Disney that the audition be a learning experience, and that it be a
positive experience. The largest group we heard in one day was 147, and
that was a LONG day!

I brought that philosophy back to my university work. On average I
auditioned 10 or more applicants for every opening in my cast. Every
auditionee got a full hearing and a complete audition. That means I had to
develop an audition form that allowed me to take quick notes that would
mean something to me when I went back and looked at it later. That, in
turn, allowed me to write individual letters to every person who
auditioned.

To me, this was VERY important: Those who MADE the group got a form letter
and a cast list. That's all it took to make THEM happy. Those who did NOT
make the group got a personal letter, addressed to them and signed by me.
These, after all, were the people I couldn't use at the time, but might be
very happy to have in the group another year. I tried to incorporate some
of that Disney philosophy. Even when I started using my trusty Commodore
64 to produce the letters more efficiently, I always reserved one paragraph
for personal comments and suggestions. If they were weak in certain areas,
I suggested additional work to develop those areas. If they were good but
I just didn't have an opening for them at the time, I told them so and
encouraged them to come back and audition again. I always had a class for
Alternates, and invited those who seemed to have the potential to take part
in it. The results were good. Those who considered my group as just one
of a number of activities they might get involved in generally dropped by
the wayside, but those who really wanted to make the cast often took my
advice and worked to improve themselves.

Following are some comments on the draft you included. You may or may not
agree with my comments, but with luck they may start you thinking in a new
way. My quotations are pretty close to the wording I actually used.

>
>Dear X,
>
>We are very sorry to have to tell you that you were not
>successful in your audition to join the XXX Choral Society.

Why start out with a negative statement? Instead of "you were not
successful" use a little honey first--"Thank you for taking the time to
share your talent with us. We regret that at this time we do not have an
opening in the Choral Society which is appropriate for your voice. We
encourage you to come back and audition for us again in the future, and
hope that we will have an opening at that time." There are some people
whom you never want to hear again, but those may be just the people who
would be most hurt at being told that! As I'm sure you know, singers find
auditions much more traumatic than instrumentalists, because your voice is
not just something wooden or metal that you learn to manipulate, it's YOU!


>
>As there is no objective measurement of a singer's
>capabilities, the decision of the auditioning panel is
>inevitably subjective.

OUCH!! That sentence states that YOU DON'T KNOW WHAT YOU'RE DOING!! There
are VERY objective measures of a singer's capabilities: in tune, flat, or
sharp; sightreads well, with difficulty, or not at all; has a useable range
or does not; has a vocal quality that will blend or one that will stick
out; sings at a volume level appropriate for the choir, is too wimpy to
contribute, or will be too overpowering; has a straight tone, a pleasant
vibrato, or a vibrato you can drive a truck through; etc., etc., etc. Your
sentence INVITES someone who is not accepted to question why. Here is
where I would insert a personal paragraph, if justified, suggesting in a
positive way that additional vocal instruction, work on breath support,
attention to pitch, or work in improving sightreading skills might improve
the singer's performance in all future auditions, not just yours. For
those who show no promise at all, you simply omit the paragraph, remaining
positive but not encouraging.

>In some cases the panel may feel that
>a particular voice, no matter how experienced, is just not
>right for the sound of this choir. That same voice may be
>absolutely right for another choir or indeed as a soloist.

This is not bad, because it is a positive statement. (And of course I
understand exactly what you are trying to get across and why!) I think I
would word it a little differently: "We encourage you to keep singing and
to look for another choir or for opportunities as a soloist where your
talents can be properly utilized at this time."

>We regret that we are unable to discuss the reasons for our
>decision.

If this is your policy, it might be better just not to say it and to
justify it on an individual basis as a question of confidentiality and
privacy FOR THE SINGERS. It isn't clear who has final say in your
auditions. If you have an audition committee that makes the decisions, you
can adopt a policy that they do not discuss their deliberations in order to
keep those deliberations confidential and unbiased. If the director makes
the final decision, I certainly would not turn someone away who sincerely
wanted to know how to improve their chances. That comes down to a personal
decision for you, but I would encourage a positive approach.

>
>If you are looking for another choir in this area, we know of
>several choirs which you may like to consider joining.
>These are:

This is nice, but could better close the paragraph above which ended
"utilized at this time."
>
>(include any amateur choirs we know)
>
>On behalf of the XXX Choral Society, I should like to thank
>you for coming to audition for us.

Belongs in the opening sentence, in my opinion.

>
>Yours sincerely,
>
>A.B.C
>(Membership Secretary)

Once again, this is a fine line between acknowledging that you, as
director, have final say, or dropping that responsibility off onto someone
else. I can't advise you because every situation is different, but in my
case it was clear that my decisions were final and that I made them myself
and took responsibility for them.

Tom: I commend you for wanting to deal with this never-ending problem. It
may be that none of my own experience will prove helpful. My only other
comment is to remind you that you can be as demanding and uncompromising as
can be when you are on the podium, dealing with musical matters, and at the
same time be supportive and encouraging to individuals when you are behind
your desk, talking one-on-one. The tough decisions come with the
territory.
---------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Wed, 22 Feb 1995 11:08:46 -0700
From: Tom Cunningham <100071.2057@compuserve.com>
Subject: How do you say no to an auditionee?

Many thanks to John M. Crowell, Paul Lawrence Hondorp, Mary Kay Geston,
Wendy Keller, Sarah Hale Lehan, Cindi Roden, Douglas Fullington, Paul A.
Eisenhart, Marty Hook, Patricia Romza, D. Brent Ballweg, Paul Sinasohn,
Michael Shasberger, John Howell, Grace Lee and Mark Aamot who replied to
my plea for help in writing a standard letter to people who are not
selected following an audition for our large choir. I greatly
appreciated your thoughtful comments.

It was interesting to see how opinions on the original proposal differed
widely:

Here are a few short quotes:
>I'd have to agree that it is pretty blunt.
>I think the letter is extremely well written and thoughtful. At some
point you
have to say "no" and that will always feel blunt to someone receiving it.
You
have said it about as nicely as you can.
>I guess, IMHO the general tone of the letter is "impolite."
>I've found that trying to explain subjectivity via the written word can
sound extremely impersonal and insincere.
>Don't stress too much. This draft sounds fine and appropriate for the
job.
>"Blunt" might be too nice of a word. We all take rejection VERY hard,
it's just our human nature.
>I'm very sympathetic with your desire to create a better letter. You
should be applauded for wanting input from others. I think that we have
all found it to be very hard to have to say "no."
>Say thank you FIRST. A little bit of sugar helps the medicine go down
(M.
Poppins)

And a couple of longer quotes:

>If at all possible, I think it's best to tell people as soon as
possible,
even at the audition if you know then - and you probably do. And I think
if it's after the fact, a phone call is always nicer than a letter. What
I've heard done is for the director to kindly explain that the person
needs
more experience before they are ready for this particular choir - more
voice training/development, more sight reading ability, more work on
getting their pitches more exact, etc. - whatever they need in order to
get
to the required level, rather than just letting them think that you think
they are a lousy singer. The other thing that's nice is to mention
groups
that are more at a 'learning' level, just as you are doing in your
letter.
Somebody more experienced whose tone quality is not right to suit the
choir
(too operatic or whatever) is going to understand when you explain that -
they probably knew it anyway.

>I have stopped sending letters, acceptance or rejection. I now make my
decision at the time of the audition and tell them at that time. I feel
that it gives them the opportunity to ask questions and get answers from
a
person. Agreed, it takes longer but I find it's worth the time. I like to
explain the reasons for my decision.

Several times I have heard a really fine voice that lacks the reading
skills that we require. I'll tell them that and suggest a reading teacher
and offer a new audition, sight reading only, when they feel they can
meet
the requirements. I have had people return as many as three times before
being accepted. Some of these people are the most dedicated since they
have really worked to get in. I have now begun doing the same with good
musicians that have vocal problems. It's paying off.

So what did we do? Here is our revised text (no flames, please!)

------------------------------------------
Dear
On behalf of The XXX Choral Society, I should like to thank you for
auditioning. We have many applicants of a very high calibre and our
decisions are difficult. We regret that at this time we are unable to
offer you membership of the choir.
Our auditioning panel has to decide which of the many singers we hear
will fit into the present sound and nature of the choir. In some cases
the panel may feel that a particular voice, no matter how experienced, is
not right for this group. That same voice may be absolutely right for
another choir or indeed as a soloist.
Again, on behalf of the XXX Choral Society, I should like to thank you
for auditioning for us.
Best wishes,
A.B.C.
(Membership secretary)
------------------------------------------
Again, many thanks to you all for your contributions. I've sent the
whole file of responses to Jim for archiving on the CRS.

Tom Cunningham
100071.2057@compuserve.com