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History: World War II

MUSIC FOR WORLD WAR II
******************************

Date: Wed, 18 May 1994 10:10:50 -0600
From: dcastong@ruacad.ac.runet.edu (David Otis Castonguay)
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII

Agnus Dei - Barber. Transcription of Adagio for Strings.
The Adagio was played over the air on NBC radio after the announcement of
FDR's death.

Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard - Britten.
Written for British POW's to perform in POW camps (1943).

Memento - Arpad Balazs. Hungarian work written in 1967 in
memory of the sacrifices all European people made during the war.

Various works by Hugo Distler.

Hymnody of Earth - Malcolm Dalglish. (excerpt) Contains
narration reflecting on the annual ceremony in Hiroshima using paper
lanterns to commemorate the victims of the atomic bombing. Leads to an
arrangement of the American folk hymn "Lay Me Low."

-----------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 18 May 1994 17:29:40 -0600
Sender: choralist@lists.colorado.edu
From: Tony Porter
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: RE: Seeking Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII

Another great piece is Vaughn Williams' "Dona Nobis Pacem."
The text is civil war poetry of Walt Whitman. Very powerful, moving piece.

------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 18 May 1994 18:28:26 -0600
Sender: choralist@lists.colorado.edu
From: Nina Gilbert
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: RE: Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII

Two suggestions for men's voices, both richly idiomatic
settings of richly poetic texts:

Samuel Barber, "A stopwatch and an ordnance map" for TTBB
choir and timpani. Text is a WWI poem by Stephen Spender.

Brendon Cassidy, "Winter-worship" for TTBB, tenor solo, and
piano. Text is a poem about I-forget-which-war - fairly universal
sentiments of soldiers on a frozen battlefield - by Charles Wright. Brendon is
an extremely promising young composer. He just graduated from Wabash
College, where we've premiered several of his works for several media. We
sang "Winter-worship" to great reception on tour last year.

-----------------------------------------------
Date: Thu, 19 May 1994 14:57:41 -0600
Sender: choralist@lists.colorado.edu
From: SweeHong Lim
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Re: Seeking Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII

You mentioned about having works from Asia - (Japan, Philippines, Chinese) for
your concert : try contacting the following Composers:

Philippines:
Dr Ramon Santos (c/o University of the Philippines)
Dilliman Campus, Quezon City
Philippines
- i'm sorry i do not have their fax or phone number, you could contact the
Philippine Embassy in Washington DC

Dr Francisco F. Feliciano (c/o Asian Institute for Liturgy
and Music)
P.O. Box 3167
Manila 1099
Philippines
Fax: 632-722-1490

Japan:
Mr Ryuta Suzuki (3-17-15 Kami-Ikedai Ota-ku)
Tokyo, Japan
Fax: 813-3720-9347

Dr I-to Loh (c/o Asian Institute for Liturgy and Music)
P.O. Box 3167
Manila 1099
Philippines
Tel: 632-721 6140

Both Filipinos and Mr Suzuki are composers in their countries, while Dr. Loh is
an ethnomusicologist with strong connection in music circles. I know that they
have published works as well as connection with people who are presently
composing.

----------------------------------------------------
Date: Thu, 19 May 1994 03:15:11 -0600
Sender: choralist@lists.colorado.edu
From: sturm
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Re: Seeking Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII

Searching in Musica International databank, I found about
350 answers corresponding mainly to french small a cappella pieces.
If you want some more or more details, ask me

One piece is particularly adapted to such a concert. It was
sung by the prisoners in the nazi camps. Its text is sometimes
attributed to Anne Franck

CHANT DES MARAIS (1943)
Edition: Lyon : A Coeur Joie
Ref : 213 ; 2 p.. - (Chansons d'Autrefois).
SATB DIFF.CHEF (A a E) : B
DIFF.CHOEUR (1 a 5): 1
Tonalite: sol mineur Duree: 4'30"
Texte en francais Stock au CAPA: 60

Concerning the message of Dean File on Totentanz (Distler) :

1. TOTENTANZ . - Distler, Hugo (1908-1942)
Edition: Mark Foster, 1934
Ref : MF125
SATB
Texte en anglais

2. TOTENTANZ . - Distler, Hugo (1908-1942)
Edition: Kassel : Barenreiter
Ref : BA 752
SATB
Texte en allemand

----------------------------------------------------
Date: Thu, 19 May 1994 14:59:58 -0600
Sender: choralist@lists.colorado.edu
From: Gibbons Henry
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: RE: Re: Seeking Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII


> > 1. TOTENTANZ . - Distler, Hugo (1908-1942)
> > Edition: Mark Foster, 1934
> > Ref : MF125
> > SATB
> > Texte en anglais

The Dance of Death would certainly seem to be appropriate
for a WWII theme, but this concept is more universal than that. The
spoken section is in fact a dialog between Death and persons from all walks
of life; as Death taps each on the shoulder, each has his excuse for not
preparing adequately for this day. The texts which Distler sets are
drawn from the *Cherubinischen Wandersmann* by Angelus Silesius, a 17th
century mystic poet whose pithy aphorisms on the true meaning of Christian
life and action still have great impact. The effect of the whole is
one of great serenity and faith. In a program such as is being
contemplated here the inclusion of this work would have the effect of placing
the
horrors and devastation of this war in the larger context of the eternal
cycle of life and death, to great advantage, I would think.
-------------------------------
Date: June 2, 1994
From: EDWARDS@macalstr.edu
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Re: Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII

Perhaps you would want to consider Luigi Dallapiccola's CANTI DI PRIGIONIA
(1938-41), published by Carisch in Milan. Although not specifically about the
end of the war, it was written as his protest against the war and sets 3 texts
which deal with larger issues of freedom (each in Latin): a prayer by Mary
Stuart, passage from Boethius' Consolatione Philosophiae, and a meditation on
the Psalm "In te Domine speravi" by Savonarola. The instrumentation is very
effective: 2 pianos, 2 harps, timpani, 4 percussion players. First & third
mov'ts are SATB; 2nd is SSAA. At least an older recording (LP) was published.
Compositionally, the work is partially 12-tone, but used to produce sonic
results very different from the 2nd Viennese School composers. Much of the
writing is extended triadic. Michele

J. Michele Edwards (Music Dept.) 612/696-6521 Bitnet: edwards@macalstr
Macalester College, St. Paul, MN 55105 Internet: edwards@macalstr.edu
--------------------------------
Date: Thu, 2 Jun 1994 11:47:35 -0600
From: "Donna Dennis"
Subject: Seeking Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII

One of our faculty composers has written a piece, premiered last
Veteran's Day (1993), to commemorate the end of WWII. "Drums and
Echoes" is for speaking chorus, percussion ensemble, and narrators
(could be one person, best if 3 - 4). 16 - 20 minutes. Uses texts
based on writings of war correspondent Ernie Pyle. Very effective.
Easy for chorus. Requires farily large percussion ensemble, 4 - 6
players.

Full score is in manuscript, available only from the composer,
Richard Albagli; write to him at: 303 21st Street, Watervliet, NY
12189. Choral score (speaking in notated rhythms) and texts
available from me (David Janower, MUSIC - PAC, SUNYA, 1400
Washington Avenue, Albany, NY 12222), but they don't tell the whole
story without percussion score.
-----------------------------------

Date: Mon, 6 Jun 1994 08:14:46 -0600
From: GLASMANN%TWSUVM.BITNET@vaxf.colorado.edu
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: WWII works

A choral work that should be considered for the commemoration of the end
of World War II is _In terra pax_ by Frank Martin. Martin was
commissioned by Radio Geneva to write a work for broadcast on Armistice
Day. Martin calls the work an "Oratorio breve;" it lasts about 45 minutes
and is scored for five soloists, double-mixed chorus, and orchestra with
organ. It is published by Universal Edition; a setting of the Lord's
Prayer for unison chorus and organ (or piano) has been extracted from
the work and is sold separately (dur. 2 min.). The text which is in
French is taken from the Bible. A CD conducted by Michel Corboz has been
released by Erato.

Frank Martin, of Mass for Double Choir fame, wrote many fine choral works.
About his _In terra pax_ he wrote: "...the proposed goal was to paint the
return of peace after the terrible years of the World War: peace? let us
understand; it is about the cessation of military hostilities.... In the
first part of this brief oratorio, I tried to paint the somber times of
war.... The second part begins with the extraordinary cry of Isaiah:
'Watchman, what of the night?'.... [In the third part] the tenor says a
few of the essential words of Christ, and the greatest of all: 'Father
forgive them for they know not what they do.' No other text could conclude
the oratorio but the Lord's Prayer. All was said then in the intimacy of
one's own heart. But an end was necessary which could return to less
intimate and more collective sentiment. I looked for this sentiment in
pure adoration, and I demonstrated that true peace can only exist on a
purely spiritual plane.... It is no longer a question of peace acquired by
arms which is discussed in front of a green tapestry. It is about the peace
spoken of by Christ when he says, 'I leave you peace, I give you my peace.'"

Robert Glasmann
School of Music
Wichita State University
glasmann@twsuvm.uc.twsu.edu
---------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 6 Jun 1994 08:17:27 -0600
From: Gibbons Henry
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Re: Programming ideras for Holocaust Concert

On Fri, 3 Jun 1994 FrankoA@aol.com wrote:

> I'm compiling a list of works for orchestra, or voices (solo or large choir)
> and orchestra which might be used in a Holocaust Commemorative concert.
> Beside "A Survivor from Warsaw", "A Child of Our Times" (Tippett), and
> Gould's "Holocaust Suite", would someone suggest further works?
>

Check out *Music in Terezin, 1941-45* by Joza Karas. It details musical
activity in the concentration camp at Terezin, including discussions of
an amazing amount of music written by the inmates, including some choral
music.

Henry Gibbons
Associate Professor of Music
College of Music, Univ. of North Texas
-----------------------------------------


Date: Mon, 6 Jun 1994 08:17:53 -0600
From: h-harada@uxa.cso.uiuc.edu (Tai Wai Li)
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: Re: Programming Ideas to Commemorate End of WWII

On 02 June, 1994, J. Michele Edwards wrote:

> Perhaps you would want to consider Luigi Dallapiccola's CANTI DI PRIGIONIA
> (1938-41), published by Carisch in Milan.....................At least an
> older recording (LP) was published. ...............

On my shelf, I found an interesting CD recording of "Canti di Prigionia"
sung by Tanglewood Festival Chorus (conducted by John Oliver) issued by
"Nonesuch" in 1983 (maybe a reissue of the above-mentioned older LP
recording). This CD also includes "Recordare (Lamentations of Jeremiah)"
(1923) by Kurt Weill--"a long, single-movement, multi-sectional motet for a
cappella voices." Weill's piece is very difficult--has anyone ever heard a
performance of it? But I found the lengthy notes written by Kim Kowalke
quite revealing in making a connection between the biblical text and
political crisis in the Weimar Republic between the two World Wars. The
score's publication data: Totowa, N.J.: European American Music Corp.,
c1982. (Tai)

Tai Wai Li
h-harada@uxa.cso.uiuc.edu

-------------------------------------------------------------------

Date: Mon, 4 Jul 1994 10:45:50 -0600
From: Tom Cunningham <100071.2057@compuserve.com>
To: Multiple recipients of list
Subject: World War 2 repertoire

Here are a few more suggestions for suitable repertoire to
commemorate the 50th anniversary of the end of the Second
World War. They come from the summer issue of the free
magazine "Oxford Music Now" and I pass them on without any
personal knowledge of the pieces or why they are suitable.
You should contact Oxford University Press for more
information (212-679-7300).

Michael Berkeley - For Mrs Tomoyasu
soprano solo, chorus, and chamber orchestra 1.2.0.2-2.0.0.0-
strings
6 minutes

Michael Berkeley - Or Shall We Die?
soprano and baritone soli, chorus, and orchestra
3(2+afl,3+picc).3(3+ca).3(3+bcl).2.cbn-4.3.3.1-
timp.5(2opt)perc-hp-pno/cel-str
50 minutes

Michael Finnissy - Maldon
baritone solo, SATB chorus, 2 trombones, 2 percussion, and
organ
20 minutes

William Mathias - Ceremony after a Fire Raid
SATB, piano, and percussion
20 minutes

Tom Cunningham
Brussels, Belgium
100071.2057@compuserve.com

-------------------------------------------
Date: 2 June 1994, 14:46:58 CDT
From: Robert Glasmann 316-689-3103 GLASMANN at TWSUVM
To: CHORALIST at LISTS.COLORADO.EDU
Subj: WWII works

Another work to consider for the commemoration of the end of the 2nd
world war is Frank Martin's In terra pax. This is a 45-minute "oratorio
breve" that was commissioned by Radio Geneva. The original intent was
to broadcast a performance of the work on Armistice Day; it was published
in 1944 and is available from Universal Editions. A CD has been released
by Erato conducted by Michel Corboz. The text is taken from the Bible
and is in French. It is scored for five soloists, double-mixed chorus,
and orchestra and organ. A setting of the Lord's Prayer that concludes
the third part of In terra pax has been published; it's scored for
unison chorus and organ or piano.

-------------------------------------------
Date: Wed, 28 Sep 1994 12:57:54 -0600
From: dcastong@ruacad.ac.runet.edu (David Otis Castonguay)
Subject: MUSIC TO COMMEMORATE WWII

Earlier this summer I posted a request for repertoire suggestions to
commemorate the last year of WW II. Specifically, looking to program for
the concert we will present on Veteran's Day, 11 November 1994. The number
and variety of the suggestions were gratifying. Many of the suggestions
were for literature which was outside the scope of our concert plans, i.e.,
Britten "War Requiem," other titles which were suitable could not included
due to time limitations on our program. I am indebted to our colleagues on
the list for their suggestions.

What follows is a three-part report for your use.

PART 1 - music selected for our concert with some explanatory notes.

PART 2 - other music suggested by Choralist members which I have seen and
can recommend.

PART 3 - other suggestions from Choralist members which I have not seen.

I will be submitting an expanded and modified version of this list to the
"Choral Journal" for the Literature Forum.

PART 1

The fundamental principal of this program was to provide the singers and
the audience an opportunity to "visit" the time period through the musical
reflections of contemporaries and then to reflect on the issues brought on
by the conflict through works composed after the war. Additionally, we
want our students to realize that in the midst of this great historical
conflict that real people lived, loved and experienced music as a part of
their lives.

PROGRAM -- PRELUDE & CONFLICT

We begin with 2 selections by Hugo Distler sung by the concert choir.
Distler, of course, committed suicide rather than be drafted into the Nazi
army. These selections are from the "Morike Chorliederbuch" composed in
1939.

"Es geht ein dunkle Volk herein" - "A Cloud Approaches Low and Dark"
"Lebewohl" - "Farewell"

(Both titles, Barenreiter/European American Music, permanently
out-of-print, Barenreiter score with text in old German type still
available)

This will be followed by

"O vos omnes" - Pablo Casals Composed in 1942 by the Spanish cellist who
escaped Fascism in Europe to live in the US. (Tetra/Plymouth AB
128) Segue to:

A 6 minute medley of vocal solos from the period accompanied by piano and
rhythm section: "The Three Little Fishies," "Mairzie Doats," "Love Walked
In," "God Bless the Child," "I've got those mad about him sad about him how
can I be glad about him blues."

segue to:

"Freedom's Land" - Roy Harris (1941) patriotic male chorus work (Belwin
Mills,
permanently out-of-print)

"Les Chant de Partizans" - unison song of the French Resistance
(MS supplied by Jean Sturm) Segue to:

"America We Stand Beside You" - unison song composed by Col. Buenaventura
of the
Philippines 8 December 1941. MS supplied by composer.

This will be followed by an interlude played by the university jazz
ensemble playing in the pit "Sing, Sing" and "Echoes of Harlem" which will
be choreographed in stylized 1940's dance members of the Department of
Dance.

PRISONERS

The women's Chorale will then perform three selections from "Song of
Survival." Music composed and arranged by women interned in camps by the
Japanese on Sumatra and nearby islands. A documentary film of their story
is available from Paradise Home Video (highly recommended). Most of the
music is available from BMG Music in Nashville (call Ruth Watkins
615-780-5420). Published in 4 volumes. You may recall the "Choral
Journal" article by Patricia Hennings (Feb 1987) about her Peninsula
Women's Chorus performing this music.

"Londonderry Air"
Largo from New World Symphony
"The Captives Hymn"

The Madrigal Singers will then perform:

"Madrigal" - Gideon Klein Composed by the Czech composer while imprisoned
in Theriesenstadt ghetto. He was eventually killed in Auschwitz. Bote &
Bock available through Presser.

The jazz ensemble will then perform a 6 minute medley of swing music with
vocal solos.

The University mixed chorus will follow with:

"Two Choruses from Testament of Freedom" - Randall Thompson (ECS)

and two works written by composers after the war which reflect upon the
sacrifice of those involved in the conflict:

"Memento" - Arpad Balazs. Hungarian composer written in 1973.
"Flanders Fields" - Alex Tilley. Canadian composer

The concert choir will return to sing a new work composed for this occasion
by Michael Sitton of Hollins College "Peace." Text by Margery Smith.

REFLECTION - FINALE

During a candlelit processional the women's Chorale will begin the finale
with "Lay Me Low" and move attacca to "Paradise" by Malcolm Dalglish. They
will be joined in "Paradise" sequentially by the combined choirs singing
from different locations in the hall. "Lay me Low" begins with narration
that recalls a visit to Hiroshima in 1985 on the anniversary of the atomic
attack. During "Paradise" the concert choir will move to the main stage
and at the conclusion of "Paradise" will sing the Barber "Agnus Dei"
attacca. The Barber is his transcription of the "Adagio for Strings." The
"Adagio" was played over the air after NBC announced the death of FDR. The
subsequent use of the "Adagio" in "Platoon" and its elegiac character, in
general, make it a fitting ending to our program.

PART 2

Works suggested by Choralist members or from my own search which I have
seen and can recommend. Some titles are pieces written during the war but
that are not necessarily related to the war.

Britten "War Requiem"
Britten "Ballad of Little Musgrave and Lady Barnard" TTB, B & H temp. o-o-p
Frank Martin "In terra pax"
William Schuman - "Requiescat" - SSAA
Cesar Geoffray - "Chant des Marais" A coeur joie
Georges Delerue - "Prieres pour les temps de detresse" A coeur joie
Holst - "Dirge for Two Veterans" - composed during WW I, but republished
in 1944.
Barber - "Reincarnations", =A9 1942
Hindemith - "In Praise of Music", 1928 revised 1943, pub 1945
Hindemith - "Six Chansons"
Honegger - "Cantat du Paix" & "Cantat du Noelle"
Luigi Dallapiccola - "Canti Di Prigionia" (1938-41)
Vaughn Williams - "Dona Nobis Pacem."
Distler - "Totentanz"
Distler - "Lo How a Rose"
Everett Titcomb - "Victory Te Deum (Te Deum Laudamus)", , Belwin Mills
Publishing, 1944.
Samuel Barber, "A stopwatch and an ordnance map" for TTBB choir and
timpani.
Text is a WWI poem by Stephen Spender.
Brendon Cassidy, "Winter-worship" for TTBB, tenor solo, and piano.

PART 3

Music suggested by members of CHORALIST which I have not seen:

Richard Albagli - "Drums and Echoes"
Michael Berkeley - For Mrs Tomoyasu soprano solo, chorus, and chamber
orchestra 1.2.0.2-2.0.0.0- strings 6 minutes
Michael Berkeley - Or Shall We Die? soprano and baritone soli, chorus, and
orchestra 3(2+afl,3+picc).3(3+ca).3(3+bcl).2.cbn-4.3.3.1-
timp.5(2opt)perc-hp- piano/cel-str 50 minutes
Michael Finnissy - Maldon baritone solo, SATB chorus, 2 trombones, 2

percussion, and organ 20 minutes
William Mathias - Ceremony after a Fire Raid SATB, piano, and percussion
20 minutes

For further reading on this subject may I suggest the following book:

CALL NO: ML128 W2 A75 1993
AUTHOR: Arnold, Ben, 1955-
MAIN TITLE: Music and war : a research and information guide / Ben
Arnold ; Michael Saffle consulting editor.
PUBLISHER: New York : Garland Pub., 1993.

Thank you for your help. Please feel free to contact me if I can help in
any way.
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
David Otis Castonguay Director of Choral Activities
Department of Music studio 703.831.5260
Box 6968 message 703.831.5177
Radford University fax 703.831.6133
Radford, VA 24142 e-mail dcastong@ruacad.ac.runet.edu
* * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *

on May 26, 2002 10:00pm
Paul Aitken's "In Flander's Fields" is especially powerful. Listen to Amabile Chamber Choir's recording, which will be available this December. www.amabile.com