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Christmas: Major works



What a remarkable response to my query. It's only been a couple of days since I made this query, but I am overwhelmed. I left out quotes and just made our list in alpha by composer. I am sure there will be additions, but for the many who asked for a compilation, here it is. Now the fun begins to research this list. Did I overlook your email? Let me know.

Don

CHRISTMAS MAJOR WORKS
Allaway ~ King of Light, Angelus in Excelsis
Ann Andersen ~ Sing Gloria
Bach ~ Magnificat, Christmas Oratorio, Cantata 140
Bass ~ A Symphony of Carols, Christmas Ornaments, We Wish You a Merry Christmas, Gloria
Bass (Claude) ~ The Holy Light
Jackson Berkey ~ The Glory of His Majesty
Berlioz ~ L'Enfance du Christ
John Biggs - A Christmas Canticle
Britten ~ A Boy Was Born, Saint Nicholas
Brubeck ~ Fiesta de la Posada
Buxtehude ~ Das neugeborne kinderlein
Charpentier ~ Midnight Mass for Christmas, In Nativitatem Domini Jesu Christum
Clausen ~ Gloria
Courtney ~ A Musicological journey Through the Twelve Days of ChristmasDavies, Peter Maxwell: O magnum mysterium
Finzi ~ In terra pax
Handel ~ Messiah, Te Deum
M. Haydn ~ Run Ye Shepherds to the Light
Herzogenberg ~ The Birth of Christ
Honegger ~ Christmas Oratorio
Leighton ~ Lully Lulla
McKinney ~ The Annunciation
Mechem ~ Seven Joys of Christmas
Menotti ~ Amahl and the Night Visitors (might do the "Shepherds Carol" from this work)
Pachelbel ~ Magnificat in G
Stephen Paulus ~ So Hallowed is the Time, Pilgrim Jesus.
Pergolesi ~ Magnificat
Poulenc ~ Gloria, Quatre Motets pour Noel
Respighi ~ Laud to the Nativity
Rheinberger ~ Die Stern von Bethlehem (cantata)
Rhodes ~ On the Morning of Christ's Nativity (Peters - PP66737)
Ringwald ~ The Song of Christmas
Rutter ~ Te Deum, Gloria, Magnificat, Where Icicles Hang
Saint-Saens ~ Christmas Oratorio
Schubert ~ Mass in D, Mass in G
Schuetz ~ Christmas Oratorio
Stroope ~ Hodie
Susa ~ Carols and Lullabies of the Southwest, Christmas Garland
Vaughn Williams ~ Hodie, The First Nowell, Fantasia on Christmas Carols
Warland - Christmas #1 and #2 (carol settings w/flute and harp)
Willcocks ~ Christ Is Born


--
Don Barrows
Conductor & Artistic Director
Federal Way Chorale
Federal Way, Washington
donbarrows(a)windermere.com
www.FWChorale.com
P.O. Box 54125
Redondo, WA 98054
--


Date: Wed, 23 Jul 1997 16:22:38 -0400
From: "Jonathan Baldwin"
Subject: Christmas Compilation-LONG

Dear listers:

Here's a compilation of suggested Christmas repertoire. Thank you all for
your contributions.

Jon Baldwin
jbaldwin(a)usa.net

____________________________________________________

1. How about the Polychoral Mass of Ignacio de Jerusalem. Chanticleer
recorded it on their Mexican Baroque CD two or three years ago. The
divisi are SSSAATTB. E-mail me privately for more infro.
2. Other ideas-Pinkham Christmas Cantata, Saint-Saens Christmas
Oratorio, Respighi Laud to the Nativity, Poulenc Gloria(big
orchestra-choral parts are most accessible).
Good Luck!
Gregory Pysh
First Presbyterian
Midland, TX
GregP(a)BasinLink.com

Check out Gerald Finzi's *In Terra Pax*.

R. Paul Drummond
pdrummond(a)undata.com

We have a fine publication "Gloria Tibi Domini" written by Barrie Cabena.

I will quote from the program notes to give you an idea of the work. If
you
should like a complimentary copy, I would be pleased to forward it to you.

"Gloria Tibi Domini is a Christmas Carol Sequence on Medieval texts for
soprano and baritone soli, SATB Choir (with optional children's choir),
organ and handbells (or synthesizer), with the option of dancing, mime,
processions and tableau. The work may be performed either a) in the
Complete Version, with staging; or b) in a somewhat shorter Concert
Version.
In the latter case, the composer has suggested that certain portions of the
work be omitted. Specific directions for the cuts are printed thoughout
the
socre. Durations: 38"00 (complete), 25"00 (concert version).

Dramatis personae: Mary, Joseph, Gabriel (and any number of angels), three
shepherds, Herod, three Kings (with possible entourage). Simple props: a
manger, a baby, a chair (for Herod), gifts (including a thurible for one of
the Kings), shepherd pipes.

The stage directions, set in boxes, occurring throught the score are merely
suggestions for possible action. In each production the director will want
to use his or her own judgement and creativity.

An important aspect of Gloria Tibi Domine is audience participation. The
audience is encouraged to join in the choruses of four of the carols, and
to
take various parts in the final canon. The pages of audience music
included
in the score, as well as the full text of the work, can be freely copied
for
inclusion in the program."

Vocal Score (Cat. No. 02.258) $8.50
Children's Choir (02.249) $1.75
Handbells (02.260) $1.00


Jaymar Music Limited
Main Web Site: http://www.jaymar.com
New Choral Issues Site: http://www.words-music.com
E-mail: music(a)jaymar.com

#1 Cantata #140, "Wachet Auf..." J. S. Bach

#2 one of the "cantata" movements from Bach's "Weinachts Oratorium"

#3 Marc-Antoine Charpentier's "Messa pour Nuit de Noel"
(wonderful mass, based on old French Carols, many of which are used in
Michel-Richard de la Lande's "Symphonie de Noels", and can be used in
Intermezzi between the mass movements.

James Gall
Tucson, Arizona

Does it have to be sacred? Thorpe Music Publishing Company has a
terrific series by The Revels. If you'd like a list of titles, e-mail
me privately at npessin(a)presser.com.

Natalie Pessin Bliss

Pergolesi Magnificat (SATB cho + SATB solos -- not difficult; 2 vln +
continuo) Walton WM-102

Rutter Magnificat is terrific, too, but calls for a much bigger orchestra.
-
Hinshaw

Respighi Laud to the Nativity -- very good.


Take a look at Ringwald's "Song of Christmas" Shawnee Press. The work
is for SATB with orchestra, narrator and a numer of soloists. It is not
overy demanding and quite dramatic.
REStoll

If not, there are many fine Magnificats that
a moderately capable church choir can do. There is Bach's of course (one
of the greatest of all time). Pergolesi's is nice, and on the contemporary
front, Gerald Finzi and René Clausen both have written fine settings.
(Rutter's is longer and a bit harder, and it's opening movement is a bit
too calypso-like for me, although the rest of it is pretty good.)

Barring these, if you're looking for something really different, I
recommend the "Jazz Gloria" by Rob Landes (published by Alliance). I got
it for my church choir two years ago, and though they generally like the
more esoteric stuff, they LOVED this. (We're doing it again this December
by their request.) You need a good jazz pianist, and it's a bonus if you
can get percussion and bass guitar as well. If your choir or church has no
objection to jazz in worship, I recommend you give it a look. It's pretty
well-written, and although there are a few parts that offer harmonic
challenges to the choir, it's not that terribly hard to prepare. This
piece passed my ultimate test for usability -- I felt that the music
enhanced and enlightened the text, rather than detracting from the spirit
of it. While I can't guarantee that you'd feel the same, I think it's
worth investigating. (BTW, I have no affiliation whatsoever with the
composer or publisher.)

Good luck in your quest for finding that different piece.


*****************************
Chuck Livesay
Director of Choral Activities
Spring Arbor College (Mich.)
clivesay(a)admin.arbor.edu


Try Gerald Finzi's Christmas 'Scene' In terra pax. 15min, S,B soli,
SSATB
chorus, strings, harp, perc. or organ
Exquisite!! despite its title, it is in English. Extensive baritone solo
on
words of Robert Bridges; soprano and chorus sing Luke. English pastoral
style, quotes the First Nowell briefly.

Also, Vaughan Williams Hodie is excellent, a more extended work.

Timothy Carney
University of Hawai'i
Oahu Choral Society
Hawai'i Vocal Arts Ensemble


Listen to Conrad Susa's "Caols & Lullabies: Christmas In The Southwest" , a
set of Mexican/Latin carols with harp, marimba, guitar and percussion. They
really are quite lovely and a bit different. They can be sung in either
spanish or english.

They are recorded by Philip Brunelle and the Plymouth Ensemble Singers on
RCA
09026-68015-2. Published by E C Shirmer.

I have only heard them, but would love to perform them.

Mark Ross

Jonathan, sounds like it's tiime for Medieval and recent 20th Century work!
How about juxtaposing the medieval setting of "There is No Rose" with
recent
settings (I can think of one by Randall Giles and one by Gerald Near both
published by Paraclete Press) as an example...

Jo Scheier

Take a look at "The Christmas Story" by Ron Nelson for narrator, Baritone
Solo, Mixed Chorus, organ, brass, and timpani.

Published by Boosey and Hawkes.

Robert Sabourin
Memorial Presbyterian Church
Midland, MI


Try Gerald Finzi's "In Terra Pax," or Respighi's "Laud to the
Nativity." Also John Gardner has a Christmas Cantata, as does Daniel
Pinkham.

Barbara Hall
Centre College
hallb(a)centre.edu


We have had great success with the MAGNIFICAT of Vivaldi as well as
the Haydn DETTINGEN TE DEUM. Not really Christmas, perhaps, but very
joyful, and when paired with some lighter Christmas fare it works.

There's also the MISSA CRIOLLA and NAVIDAD NUESTRA; both audience and
chorus will love it. We used some Hispanic kids from a nearby
Catholic Church to do some Christmas pantomimes during the
NAVIDAD....it worked very well!

Jeordano Martinez
Naperville Chorus
Naperville, IL

Date: Fri, 25 Jul 1997 13:02:09 -0500
From: "Jonathan Baldwin"
Subject: More Christmas music, Compilation

Here are more suggestions for Christmas music, compiled for the list.

Jonathan Baldwin
jbaldwin(a)usa.net

___________________

Try Gerald Finzi's "In Terra Pax," or Respighi's "Laud to the
Nativity." Also John Gardner has a Christmas Cantata, as does Daniel
Pinkham.

Barbara Hall
Centre College
hallb(a)centre.edu

Take a look at "The Christmas Story" by Ron Nelson for narrator, Baritone
Solo, Mixed Chorus, organ, brass, and timpani.

Published by Boosey and Hawkes.

Robert Sabourin
Memorial Presbyterian Church
Midland, MI

Jonathan, sounds like it's tiime for Medieval and recent 20th Century work!
How about juxtaposing the medieval setting of "There is No Rose" with
recent
settings (I can think of one by Randall Giles and one by Gerald Near both
published by Paraclete Press) as an example...

Jo Scheier

Listen to Conrad Susa's "Caols & Lullabies: Christmas In The Southwest" , a
set of Mexican/Latin carols with harp, marimba, guitar and percussion. They
really are quite lovely and a bit different. They can be sung in either
spanish or english.

They are recorded by Philip Brunelle and the Plymouth Ensemble Singers on
RCA
09026-68015-2. Published by E C Shirmer.

I have only heard them, but would love to perform them.

Date: Tue, 9 Sep 1997 12:25:59 -0400 (EDT)
From: Charles Kaufmann
Subject: Choralist Christmas Cantata Responses

I received the following responses to my request for American
Christmas Cantatas.

Thanks to everyone.

Chip Kaufmann, director of music,
The Congregational Church of Exeter, New Hampshire, U.S.A.

ckaufman(a)bowdoin.edu

webmaster for the Lygonia Consort Home Page
(a vocal and period instrument Baroque ensemble from Maine):
http://www.javanet.com/~lrm
*****************************************************



P Pinkham's "Christmas Cantata" is the most obvious choice I can think of.
Consider also a set of pieces by Gabrieli, with Brasses playing the
second choir. I'd be interested in a compilation.

Nina Nash-Robertson
Central Michigan University
******************************

No doubt you will hear from many people that the Pinkham, Christmas
Cantata
is a good choice. The difficulty level is within the reach of a good
high
school choir or a freshman level college choir. The accompaniment is
brass
quartet or quintet with organ, or you can use double brass quartet.

Good luck!

Ouida Taylor
Richland College
Dallas
*************************************
Daniel Pinkham's Christmas Cantata, for SATB and 2 brass
choirs (I: Tpt 1,2; Tbn 1,2 -- II: Tpt 1,2; Tbn 1 (or Horn),
Tbn 2, Bar or Tba); about 8 minutes. Publ: Robert King
Conductor's score comes with set of parts; separate chorus parts.

I'm doing it this year with my Western New York Chorale, as
a matter of fact.

Best wishes,

Herb Tinney
Buffalo Ny
*************************************
Daniel Pinkham's Christmas Cantata, w/ org & brass 4tet, or brass 8tet,
seems
ready-made. DR
Have you looked the Pinkham Christmas Cantata? You can do it with two
brass choirs or brass choir and organ with SATB.

Matthew Swickey
Tampa, Florida, USA
***************************************






No doubt you will hear from many people that the Pinkham, Christmas
Cantata
is a good choice. The difficulty level is within the reach of a good
high
school choir or a freshman level college choir. The accompaniment is
brass
quartet or quintet with organ, or you can use double brass quartet.
Good luck!

Ouida Taylor
Richland College
Dallas
*********************************************
Have you looked the Pinkham Christmas Cantata? You can do it with two
brass choirs or brass choir and organ with SATB.

Matthew Swickey
Tampa, Florida, USA
*****************************************
Daniel Pinkham : Christmas Cantata
John Rutter : Gloria

Both use a brass ensemble.......organ is normally used in the Rutter,
can't
remember with the Pinkham, but I'm sure piano would suffice.
They are both exciting works that take work, but are worth it in the
end....
Tim Rausenberger
Middle School Choral Director, Mahwah, NJ
brasstenor(a)aol.com
*************************************
Susa's Carols and Lullabies: Music of the American Southwest (but
it's really all Spanish stuff) for harp, guitar, and marimba. EC
SChirmer. recorded by Philip Brunelle.

David Griggs-Janower
Albany Pro Musica
228 Placid Drive
Schenectady, NY 12303-5118
518/356-9155

***********************************
Consider Honegger's Cantique De Noel.

Wm. García Ganz
Associate Director, UC Choral Ensembles
51 César Chavez Center #4280
Berkeley, CA 94720-4280
510 643-9645 Email: billganz(a)uclink2.berkeley.edu



**************************************
May I suggest John Leavitt's Hodie? Uses keyboard and 2 percussionists.
Nice blend of old and new. My group performed it last year. Also,
Pinkam's Christmas Cantata with brass comes to mind.

Linda Saripalli
Sharon Community Chorus
Sharon, MA
***********************************************

I recommend Hodie by John Leavitt published by Hal Leonard. A short work
15-20 minutes,familiar carols. I did it with Chamber Orchestra last
year.
The audience and singers (mostly professional loved it). Good Luck!
Gary E.Morris Director of Choirs
Fax/Message 501 933-0900 Jonesboro High School
morrisg(a)jhs.jps.k12.ar.us 301 Hurricane Drive
Jonesboro AR 72401
******************************************


You might look at some of John Leavitt's music; it is very
accessible
and well written.


Cheers,
Bryan Black
Director of Music
First United Methodist Church of Atlanta, Georgia
*********************************************

how about CHRISTMAS DAY by G. Holst (Not american, though)

its a short work of carols...not really a cantata per say....but worth
looking into


good luck,


david kowalczyk

********************************************

I highly recommend Lloyd Pfautsch's "A Day for Dancing"; a work of about
20-25 minutes in length, nine movements, accompanied by flute, oboe,
bassoon and a fourth wind instr (horn I think - I am answering this from
home and my score is in my office) and one percussion player. I did it
a
few years ago and both choir and audience loved it.

Richard Householder

Prof. Richard Householder Phone (519) 253-3000,
ext. 2797
Director of Choral Activities Fax (519)
971-3614
University of Windsor e-mail:
rhouseh(a)uwindsor.ca
Windsor, Ontario
Canada N9B 3P4
**************************************
Day for Dancing - Pfautsch. Ob., fl. bsn, percussion. dancers
preferable. Lawson-Gould It really is arranged like a traditional
lessons and carols, so you could add the lessons if you wanted.
Wonder Tidings - John LaMontaigne. HWGray, I think. Has some
narration.
David McCormick
***********************************************
Can I suggest the John LaMontaine Seven Lesson and Carols --
scored for chorus, harp, and I believe narrator (it's been several
years).
G Good Stuff!

Marky
**************************************************
Have you tried the Saint-Saens Christmas Oratorio? (it's
s.a.t.b. with a small string ensemble with harp (we used organ in place
of harp I think))
Don Flentje
flentje(a)juno.com
************************************************
You might look at Ottorino Respighi's _Laud to the Nativity_. Sop,
Mezz,
Ten soli SATB div. with 2 fl, ob, EH, 2 bassoon, piano 4h, triangle. It
has 4-part men in sections.

Daniel Pinkham's _Christmas Cantata_ is also nice - SATB w/ brass.

Lee G. Barrow
barrow(a)fau.campus.mci.net
*************************************************



Take a look at American Christmas / American Rhapsody (I don't recall
the
composer) published by Alliance. They have a web page
and have been very good with inquiries and
sample
copies when I have called them.
You might also want to think about John Rutter's Gloria, with organ,
brass
and percussion, which is not specifically Christmas but has a closely
related
text.
R. John Specht
Queensborough Chorus
Bayside NY .
RJohn196(a)aol.com
rjsqb(a)cunyvm.cuny.edu
********************************************************************
We have a multimovement work (not too difficult) for SATB choir, harp,
and
percussion (1 performer). If you send me a complete address and phone
no.
I can send you one for perusal purposes.
David Bohn, composer, organist
Assistant Editor/Head Internet Surfer
Mark Foster Music Company, Box 4012, Champaign, IL 61824-4012
800-359-1386 FAX: 217-398-2791 Phone: 217-398-2760
Business: markfostermus(a)champ.il.aads.net
************************************************************************
I have a piece I recently published entitled "Sing Gloria" which is,
although not long, the type of showy piece you could build a Christmas
concert around. It is in 5/8 time (first section), then an acappella
midsection which uses the Isaiah "For unto us...", then returns to the
lively 5/8. Accompaniment is one piano, four hands. The piece isn't
terribly difficult for an SATB choir to learn, but your two pianists
need
to be quite capable rhythmically and technique-wise.
You might put together a whole concert of "Glorias" by different
composers. I'm sure there are many by 20th-century composers of all
styles, even Brubeck, Lloyd Weber, etc.; and you certainly should not
have
any trouble finding more if you go back to other historical music
periods.
We did a concert like that several years ago with our Choir of the North
here at U. of Alaska Fairbanks, and it was interesting and successful.
You might also take a different tack and base the concert on music by
one
composer. I have lots of Christmas music for SATB and one for SSA; much
of my choral music is arranged for SATB w/children, but a soloist (or
two
singing the part in unison) could be successfully used in place of
children. I'll put a free sample copy of "Sing Gloria" in the mail to
you today. If you want to see any of my other music, please e-mail me
and I'll be happy to send it. Cheers!
Ann K Andersen

*****************************************************************
If I may immodestly suggest a piece of my own:
THIS CHILD, THIS KING is a cantata for soprano and tenor soloists and
chorus with accompaniment of organ, harp, and timpani. It is about 22
minutes long and makes no extraordinary demands on the performers
(although the organ and the organist should both be competent, if you
know what I mean!).

It is published by Dunstan House, distributed by Intrada Music Group
(1-800-INTRADA) and available on a CD called "Sing Me to Heaven: the
Choral Music of Daniel E. Gawthrop." The CD is on the Integra Music
label (also distributed by Intrada) and is catalog IMCD951.

I would be happy to send you an examination copy if you will provide a
mailing address.

Dan Gawthrop

***************************************************************
Hello all. I have been lurking about for some time without
introducing myself because I am not a choral conductor. I
am, however, a composer who has composed a number of choral
works(as well as chamber works, orchestral etc). Since we
are approaching the Christmas season I would like to mention
an original work that I have for SSA, flute obligato and
piano entitled "Sing Nowell".I also have a version without
the flute. The text is anonymous and can be used as either
a sacred text or,as in the case of public schools,a secular
text. It never actually mentions the birth of the child
Christ but refers to "Holiday ".This was deliberately done
to accomodate the commissioning party-The Peninsula
Children's Chorale. The piece has been performed quite a
number of times (and is a favorite with young people) here
in the SF Bay Area both by children's and women's choirs.
If anyone is interested I can send a perusal score and tape.
The work is unpublished(although typeset!) and is available
from me, the composer.
Nancy Bloomer Deussen-composer

deussen(a)ix.netcom.com
************************************************************





I saw your choralist posting. This may fit the bill. If you send me
your
address, I'll send a sample copy.

Looking for something new for Christmas? Here's a piece of mine for
brass
(quartet or quintet) and chorus: Winterfest. (It's my answer to
Ceremony
of Carols.)

Winterfest is a five movement work based on Christmas traditions that
are
rooted in pre-Christian rituals. (That doesn't narrow it down much!)
The
texts date from the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Loosely in the form of
a
banquet, the movements are as follows:

I. Proface (an old English greeting meaning "much good may it do you!")
II. Bring Us in Good Ale, canonic, amusing
III. The Boar's Head
IV. I Saw a Sweet and Blessed Sight, a lullabye
V. What Cheer? Good Cheer!

Q & A
"Is it singable?"
I'm a choral conductor of some experience, and this piece was written
for a
community chorus. It is gracious to the voice. There are some
difficult
spots, but these are balanced by easier sections, and supported by
brass.

"Is it legible?"
This question is starting to go away. The score is computer generated,
and
very, very clear and well edited.

"Is it likable?"
Audiences have responded consistently and well. The rhythms are
interesting, even catchy. Do I detect a bit of Stravinski? Britten?

"Can I afford it?"
I self-publish, so there are no middlemen or outrageous contemporary
score
fees. And I give volume discounts!


Contact me for sample scores. The movements may be performed
separately,
as well.
Ray Fahrner
Computing Support Specialist
CCR, E17-110
253-4484


Ray Fahrner
532 Franklin Street
Cambridge, MA 02139

on May 16, 2004 10:00pm
Thanks Don,
( A voice from the past)I have just recently appointed director of Choral Activities at George Fox University in Newberg Oregon. I appreciated the information.
L. Wenz
on November 5, 2004 10:00pm
I'm hoping someone can help us. Our church needs the accompaniment to "Christmas...In Splendor & Majesty" by Otis Skillings. The copy we have is on a very delicate reel-to-reel and we're afraid it will break during the performance...or during trying to have it copied to a cassette. Does ANYONE know where we could obtain a copy of this?
Please email me at webmaster@highlandparkcog.org
Thanks so much and God Bless!