KI
Advertise on ChoralNet 
ChoralNet logo
The mission of the ACDA is to inspire excellence in choral music through education, performance, composition, and advocacy.

Suggestions for a great Christian Music Curriculum for Elementary

I've just started a teaching job at a private Christian school and currently I'm teaching grades 7-12 choir.  They are adding grades 2-6 to my schedule. It's a small school, so it's not as overbearing as it may sound; however, with my background in music education for public schools, I'm looking for a conservative Christian curriculum that would teach elementary music with an excellent methodology.  
 
I'm a strong believer in teaching movable 'do' solfege and the importance of rhythm.  I also want to teach music literacy and basic recorder skills.
 
Any suggestions?  Has anyone tried Bob Jones University Press (BJU Press), Pfeiffer House Music, or A Beka?
 
Thanks,
Lillian
on November 18, 2011 5:18pm
Lillian:  None of the specific subjects or methodology you mention wanting to teach is intrinsically Christian or non-Christian.  Where you probably want to pay close attention is the choice of performance repertoire, moreso than teaching repertoire.
 
Kodály agreed on the use of movable-do solfege and the importance of music literacy.  You might want to acquire Kodály certification.
 
For basic recorder skills I recommend "Recorder in the Kodály Classroom," by Susan Taylor Howell.  (Disclaimer:  Susie was my late wife, and I typed every word of the book!!!)
 
All the best,
John
on November 19, 2011 8:00am
As a Musikgarten teacher, I taught the class called "God's Children Sing" to the junior Sunday School classes at my church for several years.  You might find these materials useful for your classroom, since the repertoire is sacred but aimed at young children.  The information about Musikgarten and these teaching materials is here: http://www.musikgarten.org/teacher_christian.cfm
 
Nancy
on November 19, 2011 10:22am
PraiseHymn has a series of workbooks called "God Made Music" that you might look at.
 
But I agree with the previous post that music education need not be intrinsically "Christian."  You might incorporate some hymns/sacred songs into your curriculum, but even if you are having them sing secular songs it won't necessarily be a "non-Christian" curriculum.
on November 19, 2011 11:43am
Hello Lillian,
 
Although we don't sell teaching materials, I think you may be interested to know about our Christian musicals and song-books for children aged 5-12. We have over 50 resources, which are very popular in the UK and increasingly so in the USA and Europe. Many are specifically for Christmas and Easter, others are Bible stories; all are Christian and Bible-based. They encompass an enjoyable range of styles from rock to ballad, with some part-singing, and a few rounds, and they're fun for children to perform. You can find out more from our website www.redheadmusic.co.uk where you can also listen to extracts - or they're on iTunes under Sheila Wilson (children's music). We're always happy to advise on suitable choices for any particular ages or requirements...

With best wishes to you in your new job,
 
Sheila.
 
on November 20, 2011 2:51pm
Hi Lillian,
 
I have spent most of my career in private Christian schools and I have used standard music curriculum with them.  But I revelle in the fact that we can talk about the meaning of, or can freely sing any sacred songs that are included.  I have never had to put on a "winter concert" where we sing about the weather!  At least half of my spring concert literature is sacred because we use it for chapel services.  I am sure that your classroom teachers aren't using Bible stories to do all of their teaching.  Just give them a quality education that is Christ centered and I think all will be happy.
 
Lois Reese
Trinity Lutheran School, Newport News, VA
on December 6, 2011 2:57pm
Since you're teaching an older age group you might like to look at the "Voice For Life' curriculum that is published by the Royal School of Church Music.  (But i do agree with the above comments that the curriculum you use need not be intrinsically religious)
 
Julie
  • You must log in or register to be able to reply to this message.