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Finnish Help

Hello choral friends,
 
If there is anyone out there fluent in Finnish, I could use some help with a translation of a Kostiainen piece - "Kiurun Tie".  No translation was provided in the published score and google translate is only so helpful.  I can tell it's about a skylark that flies and sings and that's there are lots of nonsense words but after that, I'm stuck!
 
Here's a transcription of the Finnish text:
Korkealla siintävimmän pilven alla kiurun laulu peää, laulu kiipeää
Enkä tiedä minne asti rintakuopan painolasti vieri tietä säihkyvää
yhden kiurun kantamalla
siintävimmän pilven alla laulu
 
Thanks very much, in advance!
Christina Murray
 
on December 30, 2011 11:48am
Christina:  I will forward this to our Community String Orchestra conductor, who is a native Finn, and to our Principal 2nd Violinist, who is also a native Finn but has lived in the U.S. for most of her life.  But it may take a while, so please let us know if you come up with a translation in the meantime.
 
Fifteen case endings--ghaaaack!!!
 
John
on December 30, 2011 4:18pm
Hello,
 
The text you give is slightly garbled, but only slightly. I do not know the piece in question, but I suspect the text actually goes:
 
Korkealla siintävimmän pilven alla kiurun laulu kiipeää,
enkä tiedä minne asti rintakuopan painolasti vieri tietä säihkyvää
yhden kiurun kantamalla
siintävimmän pilven alla.
 
Literal translation:
High under the most bluish cloud the skylark's song climbs,
and I do not know how far the burden of the chest-cavity rolled along the shining road
as far as one skylark flies
under the most bluish cloud.
 
More meaningful translation:
High under the dark clouds the skylark climbs singing,
but I do not know how far the ache of my empty heart can travel
on the road of the sky as far as the skylark flies
high under the dark clouds.
 
Gloss:
A bird sings high in the sky. I would like to be free like the bird, but I feel like crap and cannot.
 
A very common theme in the suicidal-depressive genres of Finnish folk poetry (which is most of it, really): the narrator is depressed/anguished, perhaps because he/she was dumped, his/her house burned down, his/her beloved was killed, etc. The crux is that the narrator cannot tell anyone about this (because talking about your feelings is a no-no unless you are drunk) but can address the natural environment or alternatively look to nature for solace, typically in the perceived carefree existence of the wind or birds or trees in the forest, etc.
 
--
Regards,
Jaakko Mäntyjärvi
Helsinki, Finland
 
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