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New/interesting Christmas repertoire for a community choir/orchestra

I have plenty of ideas for Christmas/holiday repertoire for the community choir & orchestra that I direct; however, I can't get really excited about any of my current thoughts. I hope that some ChoralNet subscribers have some new/interesting ideas to share. Conceptually I would prefer a program that focuses on repertoire from a single country. I'm looking for a program mix of choral/orchestral and orchestral music appropriate for amateur ensembles of a modest size.  Thanks! I look forward to hearing some of your suggestions. 
on July 17, 2012 3:46am
Kathryn: I have just finished four suites of carols for choir and orchestra. Send me your e-mail and I will get you copies.
Jerome Malek
on July 17, 2012 6:55am
Hello, Kathryn,
 
Not on your "country" theme, but I have several fresh things; 2 secular novelties and a short Chanukah piece if you are doing an ecumenical mix. You can check them out on my website (below).
 
1. The Chocolate Carol
2. Flopsy the Christmas pup
3. Chanukah tonight (string orchestra)
 
All are accessible for your type/size of group, and really fun to sing and hear.
 
Please let me know offline if any of these are of interest.
 
David Avshalomov
Composer, Singer, Conductor
Special Citation Winner, American Prize 2012/Orchestral Composition
Santa Monica
davshalomov(a)earthlink.net
www.davidavshalomov.com
310-480-9525
 
on July 17, 2012 9:30am
Hello, I have a Celtic setting/arrangement of the melody Veni Emmanuel. The piece is called "Rejoice" and is for choir and orchestra. The text is community friendly, and it was a hit last year at our Santa Cruz World Choir and Orchestra Winter performance. Please feel free to email me if you would like to know more. Slbigger(a)santacruzworldchoir.com
on July 17, 2012 5:07pm
I can offer you two possibilities.  Suitable for modest sized choruses.
 
Come Christmas is a wreath of a dozen carols based on poems of Eleanor Farjeon.
Duration: 30 minutes.  Chorus, two soloists, chamber orchestra (2222/2200/perc+timp/hp/str)
 
Now is the time is a cycle of settings of carol texts, mostly medieval, for baritone solo,
chorus, brass quintet, and timpani.  Sixteen numbers, lasting 50 minutes.  it is possible
to include a children's chorus.  Also available with full orchestra accompaniment.
 
Excerpts possible.  Scores and recordings avaliable on request.  
 
Some of these numbers have been published.  Visit http://www.thorpemusic.com/holmes01.html
for some samples.  Several of these numbers have won composition contests.
 
Brian Holmes
2012 Winner, American Prize for Choral Composition
on July 18, 2012 5:10am
If you're looking for something a little different, I did an arrangement of the English carol based on 'Greensleeves' ('What Child is this?) for a Norwegian Cathedral choir, which incorporates a violin soloist.  You can see their performance on youtube at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZbSHeDZ7ois.   The arrangement is published by Norsk Musikforlag.
 
Gordon
on July 18, 2012 9:18am
Hi, Kathryn - My Three a cappella Carols  have gotten a good reception from choirs and audiences. There is a link to soundfiles on the home page of my website: http://www.clareshore.com/
 
Thank you,
Clare Shore
on July 18, 2012 11:11pm
El Desembre Congelat
arranged Ian Charter
 
 
on July 19, 2012 7:34pm
Hi Kathryn,
 
If you have an orchestra handy- you should consider performing (as your finale- regardless of what you do) Mark Hayes' Variations on Jingle Bells. Boy- that piece is fun and it's a crowd pleaser!!! And the choir will really love singing it. :-)
 
Good luck!
 
Ryan Pryslak
on July 20, 2012 5:08am
Instead of replying, I inadvertently started a new thread. (Sorry, I'm new here.) Please take a look at my recent post titled Choral work (published 2010). I hope you find this piece interesting.
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