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Fugue for unauditioned high school choir.

Hello all,
I would like to do a fugue with my non auditioned high school choir. I was thinking perhaps Banquet Fugue,  but I would appreciate other suggestions. We did Sicut Locutus Est two years ago, and I wanted try another one with the group I have now.
 
Thanks!
on February 24, 2014 5:35am
How 'bout Ernst Toch's Geographical Fugue?  It's spoken.
 
Ray
Applauded by an audience of 1
on February 24, 2014 8:58am
Hi Gayle,
 
Here are two, four part (any combination of voices) spoken fugues that my choirs have enjoyed in the past: 
 
Gastronomical Fugue - Kirby Shaw - Hal Leonard #08742325
 
The Geographical Fugue - Ernst Toch - Belwin Mills - #347 (this is from 1950 so I am not sure if it is still available) 
 
I hope this is helpful! 
J
Jackie Hawley
Artistic Director: Ottawa Children's Choir
www.ottawachildrenschoir.ca
Founding Director: Cantiamo Girls Choir of Ottawa
www.cantiamogirlschoir.ca
on February 24, 2014 2:49pm
Bach/Swingle: Fugue in c minor (Well Tempered Klavier)   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U85-4EYgZk4          
Glenn Gould So You want to write a fuguehttp://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RPBro9mzoVM
Genee:  Insalata Italianna   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pHQHLNoWGE0
 
The Geographical Fugue may be a good place to start.  The important features of fugal procedure are there.  Of the three fugues which I have linked you to , The Insalata is the only one conceived for voices. It is very funny and it covers nearly every operatic and singer and fugal ideosycracies available which can be acted out with props. Great fun but a very serious example of a fugue.  So you Want to Write a Fugue is the most daunting of the three and the  Bach/Swingle is the straight out swiping of the Well Tempered Clavier,Fugue in Cminor movement and, coincidentally,in the same key as the Gould. (The link I chose has a verygraphic representation of the fugue. As such, it makes a very gratifying seque from the Gould which ends, "we're going to write a fugue right now! (and then you do).  
 
I would never perform all three in the same concert. Except for the possible pairing of the Gould and the Bach/Swingle, too much of a good thing is just too much of a good thing.
 
Have fun. Your choir will learn a great deal
 
S
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